References in classic literature ?
I don't know what's the matter with him, but it is a great shame to send out a lame beast like this.
And if you don't want to lame your horse you must look sharp and get them out quickly.
This last question was addressed to the lame man, who, unobserved by Mr.
The little attorney burst into a loud laugh, and returning the card to the lame man, informing him it was all a mistake, whispered to Mr.
Lastly, when the famed lame god had made all the armour, he took it and set it before the mother of Achilles; whereon she darted like a falcon from the snowy summits of Olympus and bore away the gleaming armour from the house of Vulcan.
Gringoire, still followed by his three persecutors, and not knowing very well what was to become of him, marched along in terror among them, turning out for the lame, stepping over the cripples in bowls, with his feet imbedded in that ant-hill of lame men, like the English captain who got caught in the quicksand of a swarm of crabs.
Upon my soul," resumed Gringoire, "I certainly do behold the blind who see, and the lame who walk, but where is the Saviour?
He knew well enough that when he died the little boy in Aberdeen, with the pretty face and lame foot, would become Lord Byron.
That tiger limps because he was born lame, as everyone knows.
One board had written upon it, "I am blind," another, "I am deaf," another, "I am dumb," and the fourth, "Pity the lame one.
Under favour, uncle,'' said the Jester, ``that were still somewhat on the bow-hand of fair justice; for it was no fault of Fangs that he was lame and could not gather the herd, but the fault of those that struck off two of his fore-claws, an operation for which, if the poor fellow had been consulted, he would scarce have given his voice.
Many of the horses were still so weak and lame, as to be unfit for a long scramble through the mountains.