lance

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Yes, and thou shalt ride the highways of England with thy stout lance and mighty sword, and behind thee thou shalt leave a trail of blood and death, for every man shalt be thy enemy.
Bronzed and hardy from his outdoor life; of few words, for there was none that he might talk with save the taciturn old man; hating the English, for that he was taught as thoroughly as swordsmanship; speaking French fluently and English poorly--and waiting impatiently for the day when the old man should send him out into the world with clanking armor and lance and shield to do battle with the knights of England.
Fair and sweet I would fain be for your dear sake, my lord, but old I am and ugly, and the knights would laugh should you lay lance in rest in such a cause.
The long lance of the warrior dipped toward us, and as thoat and rider hurtled beneath, the point passed through the body of our antagonist.
When the man discovered me he released his hold upon Dian and sprang to the ground, ready with his lance to meet me.
Hard-Heart dropped one end of his lance to the earth, and having also cast his shield across his shoulder, he sat leaning lightly on the weapon, as he answered with a smile of no doubtful expression--
The Pawnee passed his lance through the beast, uttering a shout of triumph as he galloped by.
The knife and the lance cut short the retreat of the larger portion of the vanquished.
The new NCG24-535 water jet lances are rated for applications requiring operating pressures of up to 24,000 psi and designed to reduce the chance of hose or fitting failure.
Allen Chronister in the article Crow Parfleche Lances in Whispering Wind Magazine (26:4), very appropriately calls them "parfleche lances "and has the following to say on the origin and use of these items: "Among the Crow, parfleche lances were historically and still are used as horseback parade items by women and girls.
Campbell's sport is jousting, and like the other competitors wielding lances on a dead run, he does not tilt at windmills.
The joust - which pits two knights on horseback dressed in armor and carrying weapons such as lances or swords - and the tournament (a contest for several knights) were medieval public events that simulated battles.