landlord


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Landlord

A lessor of real property; the owner or possessor of an estate in land or a rental property, who, in an exchange for rent, leases it to another individual known as the tenant.

Cross-references

Landlord and Tenant.

landlord

n. a person who owns real property and rents or leases it to another, called a "tenant." (See: lease, rent, lessor, lessee, tenant)

landlord

noun agrorum possessor, lessor, owner of an estate in land, owner of lands, owner of tenements, propietory owner, proprietor
Associated concepts: ejectment proceeding, landlord's lien
See also: landholder, landowner, lessor, proprietor

landlord

one who grants a lease or tenancy to another, usually in return for a RENT. See LEASE.

LANDLORD. He who rents or leases real estate to another.
     2. He is bound to perform certain duties and is entitled to certain rights, which will here be briefly considered. 1st. His obligations are, 1. To perform all the express covenants into which he has entered in making the lease. 2. To secure to the tenant the quiet enjoyment of the premises leased; but a tenant for years has no remedy against his landlord, if he be ousted by one who has no title, in that case the law leaves him to his remedy against the wrong doer. Y. B. 22 H. VI. 52 b, and 32 H. VI. 32 b; Cro. Eliz. 214; 2 Leon. 104; and see Bac. Ab. Covenant, B. But the implied covenant for quiet enjoyment may be qualified, and enlarged or narrowed according to the particular agreement of the parties; and a general covenant for quiet enjoyment does not extend to wrongful evictions or disturbances by a stranger. Y. B. 26 H. VIII. 3 b. 3. The landlord is bound by his express covenant to repair the premises, but unless he bind himself by express covenant the tenant cannot compel him to repair. 1 Saund. 320; 1 Vent. 26, 44; 1 Sedgw. on Dam. 429; 2 Keb. 505; 1 T. R. 812; 1 Sim. R. 146.
     3. His rights are, 1. To receive the rent agreed upon, and to enforce all the express covenants into which the tenant may have entered. 2. To require the lessee to treat the premises demised in such manner that no injury be done to the inheritance, and prevent waste. 3. To have the possession of the premises after the expiration of the lease. Vide, generally, Com. L. & T., B. 3, c. 1; Woodf. L. & T. ch. 10; 2 Bl. Com. by Chitty, 275, note; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; 1 Supp. to Ves. Jr. 212, 246, 249; 2 Id. 232, 403; Com. Dig. Estate by Grant, G 1; 5 Com. Dig. tit. Nisi Prius Dig. page 553; 8 Com. Dig. 694; Whart. Dig. Landlord & Tenant. As to frauds between landlord and tenant, see Hov. Pr. c. 6, p. 199 to 225.

References in classic literature ?
The landlord chuckled again with his lean chuckle, and seemed to be mightily tickled at something beyond my comprehension.
So I took the key of the house to the landlord, who was very glad to get it; and the beds were sent over to the King's Bench, except mine, for which a little room was hired outside the walls in the neighbourhood of that Institution, very much to my satisfaction, since the Micawbers and I had become too used to one another, in our troubles, to part.
Come, come," said the landlord, who felt that paying people for their absence was a principle dangerous to society; "a joke's a joke.
But to give him anything to drink was impossible, or would have been so had not the landlord bored a reed, and putting one end in his mouth poured the wine into him through the other; all which he bore with patience rather than sever the ribbons of his helmet.
He's come,' said the landlord, after he had filled and lighted his pipe.
Be so good, landlord, as not to swear, but remember this: cats were formerly considered, in India, as sacred animals.
At the time it did not seem to me nearly so urgent that the landlord should leave his.
While she was speaking, the landlord had come in and had begun to look at her as earnestly as his wife had done.
As she inspected her new abode she ordered her chair to be stopped at intervals in order that, with finger extended towards some article of furniture, she might ply the respectfully smiling, yet secretly apprehensive, landlord with unexpected questions.
An hour or two afterwards the landlord got up, and took his handkerchief to wipe his face, but the pin ran into him and pricked him: then he walked into the kitchen to light his pipe at the fire, but when he stirred it up the eggshells flew into his eyes, and almost blinded him.
quoth the landlord, calling the Tinker Worship to soothe him, as a man would pour oil upon angry water.
On accosting the landlord, the fair gentleman volunteered the following statement: