langour

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References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, leaning back in his chair, he had allowed a large white handkerchief to depend gracefully from his fingers--a pose at once suggesting easy and elegant langour.
It has five national parks of which two are the world heritage sites, Kaziranga national park for one- horn rhinos and Manas for Golden Langour.
There was also a lyrical duo from Boris and Rital, which was the stuff of dreams and moonlight with an exquisite langour within the arm movements given to the ballerina, and Shostakovitch's music rising to the occasion with a beauty which brought a lump to your throat.
The mark of a sophisticated adult boudoir is one that entices you in, seducing you with its promise of langour and comfort, but it's hard to relax and make the most of it if all you can see is mess that doesn't belong there.
The principal female parts in the serious operas are invariably written for a soprano-sfogato; and it must be admitted, that it is the voice peculiarly adapted to the prevailing character of the music; for its extreme purity and delicacy enables it at one time to wend its way deftly and unerringly through the most fluttering passage, and at another to breathe forth meaning tones which sink upon the heart with the gentle burden of that voluptuous, yet spiritual, langour, which seems an influence shed from above upon all the natives of the Saturnian land.
In truth, when the animal spirits are regenerated in niggardly supply, and at the same time are devoured on account of the continuous quasi-ecstasy of the mind in the brain, by degrees partly the voluntary motions and partly the natural [motions], grow quiet, langour of the whole arises, the circulation of the blood loses vigor .
There is neither voluptuousness nor langour about them.
The cause of this langour is no secret; it comes of indulgence in sexual passion and the image sums up for him the modern pursuit of godless, fleshly pleasure.
The hot day could suggest that this is a post-coitum langour, and the rhyme word laid might not be as innocent as a reader might originally assume it to be.
When he agrees to this, his hands are released, and he is sent to heal and convert other Jews: "Ye Jewys that langour in this gret infyrmyte / Belevyth in Crist Jesu and ye schal haue helthe" (464-65).
The film's unhurried surface, all quotidian tarry and erotic langour, begins to roil with portentous incident and unspoken sorrow when the lovers leave the city for an afternoon tryst in the forest (emblematically set on the Thai-Burmese border; borderlines are a key motif in Weerasethakul's work).