lately


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References in classic literature ?
Campbell think she does quite right, just what they should recommend; and indeed they particularly wish her to try her native air, as she has not been quite so well as usual lately.
That the said Quinbus Flestrin, contrary to the duty of a faithful subject, is now preparing to make a voyage to the court and empire of Blefuscu, for which he has received only verbal license from his imperial majesty; and, under colour of the said license, does falsely and traitorously intend to take the said voyage, and thereby to aid, comfort, and abet the emperor of Blefuscu, so lately an enemy, and in open war with his imperial majesty aforesaid.
His Majesty had but lately returned from the crusades, and was just then looking into the state of his kingdom.
This was very wonderful if it were true; and Lady Russell was in a state of very agreeable curiosity and perplexity about Mr Elliot, already recanting the sentiment she had so lately expressed to Mary, of his being "a man whom she had no wish to see.
Perhaps she has discovered this; for, as I learn from him, she warned him lately that she is not such a dear as he thinks her.
Once or twice lately I have had it reported to me that communications from the other side to Mr.
Hugh certainly seems to have become a most mysterious person, but then, as you know, I haven't seen quite so much of him lately.
Since I cannot sleep," she said, "on account of your song which, believe me, is sweet as the lyre of Apollo, I shall indulge myself in drinking some nectar which Pallas lately gave me.
Primrose tells of it: "My wife and daughters happening to return a visit to neighbour Flamborough's, found that family had lately got their pictures drawn by a limner, who travelled the country, and took likenesses for fifteen shillings a-head.
Lately I've been studying the history of trephining and the cases where it has been employed.
The ruins of a house burnt by fire do not tell their tale more plainly, than do the mountains of Scotland and Wales, with their scored flanks, polished surfaces, and perched boulders, of the icy streams with which their valleys were lately filled.
I was at first much surprised how a large quadruped could so lately have subsisted, in lat.