lawful power

lawful power

noun allowed authority, authority auuhorized by law, constitutional power, established power, force in power, lawful right, legal power, legalized authorrty, legitimate authority, legitimized power, permitted auuhority, power according to law, proper power, rightful auuhority, sanctioned power, valid power, warranted power
Associated concepts: carrying of weapons
See also: force
References in periodicals archive ?
By affixing our signatures hereto, we the undersigned commit ourselves to doing everything in our lawful power to protect our territories from the Kinder Morgan expansion project, and any other tar sands projects that would increase the transportation of tar sands oil through our territories.
After Cardinal Pandulph, the Pope's delegate, pronounces an act of excommunication against John, "by the lawful power that I have," as he puts it, John's rival, Constance, chimes in: "O, lawful let it be / That I have room with Rome to curse awhile
because a particular department of the government may exert its lawful powers with the object or motive of reaching an end not justified, therefore it becomes the duty of the judiciary to restrain the exercise of a lawful power wherever it seems to the judicial mind that such lawful power has been abused.
Indeed, we don't have the lawful power to carry that sort of operation out.
Albert Hani adds that such documents have no lawful power to make parties be correct and therefore there is no need of such memorandums.
The government does not have the lawful power to force people to act in violation of their consciences.
Furthermore, the use of a lawful power solely to achieve an illegal objective would not be acceptable under the Convention, regardless of whether such a use of a national legal provision is considered within the country concerned to be objectionable.
As the police serve Her Majesty, it is untenable that they be accountable through commissioners to the Prime Minister who has no lawful power over them.
He had no lawful power of arrest as no offence had been committed under the Theft Act.
Given the fare was not legally enforceable Mr Quigley had no lawful power of arrest as no offence had been committed.
Still, it is no small thing when a former dictator in the dock looks the world in the face and does not pretend that his crimes did not happen, merely that he had the lawful power to commit them.
A YES, since December 2004 it has been a person's right to give lawful power of attorney to someone else using an Advance Directive or Living Will to have treatment stopped if they are too ill to request this themselves.