layman

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Related to laywomen: Lay person

layman

noun amateur, civilian, laic, nonprofessional, nonspecialist, one who has no specialized training, unnkilled practitioner, untrained person
Associated concepts: lay witness
See also: amateur

LAYMAN, eccl. law. One who is not an ecclesiastic nor a clergyman.

References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that laywomen may have consulted certain monks around these matters, monks they not only trusted to keep their secrets but who also may have been literate and were perceived as having access to special medical knowledge, is not altogether surprising.
Similarly, women are commonly told by many monks and even other laywomen that 'it's not necessary to ordain to practice'.
As regards nomenclature, village jomos are identified in contrast to laywomen and to male lamas (who can marry).
Finally, Diefendorf argues that the heroic asceticism of these laywomen resulted in more than just the founding of fifty new convents and female religious houses, as penitential piety eventually evolved into significant charitable service to the community.
One reason for the decline, Clarke said, is the expansion of the roles that laywomen can play in the Catholic Church.
Organized church and synagogue laywomen seldom mounted campaigns for women's ordination, and laywomen were as apt as laymen to oppose clergywomen's appointments in the churches.
Denise Despres traces responses to The Orcherd of Syon (the English version of Catherine of Siena's Dialogue), arguing that Catherine is made a contained and isolated figure for the nuns of Syon as she is for upperclass laywomen, but that Kempe (perhaps partly through her Italian experience) understood the Dialogue's linking of active and contemplative lives and struggled in her Boke to reconcile mendicant and Carthusian-led monastic piety.
By the fourth session, the women included ten members of religious congregations and one from a secular institute; only two of the remaining laywomen were married.
Allowing women to become priests, especially nuns and active, knowledgeable laywomen in the church, would invigorate many fallen-away Catholics and bring them back to Mass.
Proportion of laywomen teachers at Catholic elementary and secondary schools (e)
Both the Catholic Mary I and her Protestant sister Elizabeth I washed the feet of poor laywomen during elaborate ceremonies in 16th-century England.