learn


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learn

verb acquire knowledge, analyze, become knowledgeable, comprehend, concentrate on, edify, enlighten, experience, gain erudition, gain information, gain knowledge, pursue knowledge, study, understand
See also: apprehend, detect, discover, find, gain, perceive, realize, study, understand
References in periodicals archive ?
NESTLE: Grades K-5, a Tarzana LEARN school with 100 open seats.
Process learning, or learning to learn, comes down solidly on the side of self-reliance.
9) Participants who learn from purposeful teaching tend to become lifelong learners who seek further educational and training opportunities, and they also lean toward modeling these behaviors in their own teaching and managerial roles.
Changing how and what children learn in school with computer-based technologies.
Such a process would help the students learn how to use this information to expand their education and career aspirations.
Learning better how to learn, to correct the mistakes of our pasts - the inevitable consequences of our humannes - and to create better futures, is the business of living.
These diagnoses include delays in acquiring language, academic, and motor skills that can affect the ability to learn, but do not meet the criteria for a specific learning disability.
Uden, McGuinness, and Alderson stated, "There is convincing evidence that people who take the initiative in learning, learn more things and learn better than do people who sit at the feet of teachers waiting to be taught.
Although teachers have the overall responsibility for leading a learning activity, the adult education philosophy espouses that everyone has something to teach and to learn from each other.
They needed to move beyond the simple subject search to discover, learn, and try many strategies to get information on their interests and to overcome OPAC breakdowns" (p.
Since learning disabilities result from deficits in information processing, poor previous educational performance might have been circumvented if appropriate accommodations had been provided to allow the client to learn using his or her strongest learning modality (Zwerlein, Smith, & Diffley, 1984).
Taking these ideas into human learning, Skinner (1976) suggests that students may learn better when they are "Drill[ed] and [forced to] Practice"; students must practice until they are properly trained.