legalese


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Legalese

Slang; technical jargon used by attorneys that is often beyond the comprehension of the nonlawyer.

States enact "plain English" laws that require the translation of legalese into everyday language to permit consumers to understand thei insurance policies, deeds, mortgages, leases, credit card financing agreements, and other legal documents.

legalese

n. slang for the sometimes arcane, convoluted and specialized jargon of lawyers and legal scholars.

legalese

noun language of the law, lawyer's lannuage, legal language, legal parlance, legal usage, legal writing, the legal profession's language
See also: jargon

legalese

the language used by the legal profession, a term now used pejoratively.
References in periodicals archive ?
So the team of arrangers drafted an Applicable Pricing Supplement, again legalese for actually naming an asking price, decided on a spread, and set off on a roadshow to South Africa's large institutional investors in September.
Editors' note: In TRIAL's October "Speaking & Writing" column (Littering with Legalese, or Get a Load of This Release, Oct.
Officials have hid behind legalese, and so the Amish have reluctantly turned to petition drives and court challenges-just the kind of engagement with the modern world they were trying to avoid by seeking traditional work.
The offer document was full of legalese, jargon and incomprehensible sentences, further alienating supporters.
Richard Harty, Unison negotiator for Coventry, said: "It goes into a lot of legalese and, to lay people, this is quite a threatening letter.
They are not experienced 'insurance' people, they don't know the legalese.
However, the Miller amendment includes some draconian legalese that has some industry attorneys taking notice.
When you distill the legalese, the CAN-SPAM law provides some pretty common-sense ground rules for practicing e-mail marketing.
95 but, Kelly said, applicants save money by not hiring a lawyer to translate the form's legalese.
1987), which pleasantly cuts through the slithy Jabberwocky of legalese, to state, "We are convinced that in the ordinary case, deputy commissioners, [now called judges of compensation claims], by reason of their experience, are well qualified to determine the reasonableness of attorneys' fees without the opinion of an expert on the subject.
For more information, contact the publishers Legalese 28-33 Cato Street, London W1H 5JL.