let

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Let

To award a contract, such as for the erection of public works, to one of several bidders.

To lease certain property.

Cross-references

Public Contract.

let

v. 1) to allow or permit. This is distinguished from "against one's will." The word can be very important legally as, in the statement "Lucy let Johnny have sexual relations with her" can make a huge difference in a claim of rape. 2) to lease or rent real property, particularly a room or apartment, to another person. (See: lease, rent)

let

(Lease), verb allow the use of, charter, contract, convey, demise, grant, grant the occupancy of, hire, hire out, lend, loan, make available, rent, rent out

let

(Permit), verb affranchise, allow, approve, assent, authorize, certify, commission, concede, concedere, empower, enable, endorse, enfranchise, entitle, favor, franchise, give leave, give permission, grant, have no objection, indulge, liberate, license, make possible, oblige, pati, privilege, release, sanction, sinere, suffer, support, tolerate, vouchsafe, warrant, yield
See also: attorn, bestow, concede, enable, engage, grant, hire, lease, permit, rent, suffer, vouchsafe

LET. Hindrance, obstacle, obstruction; as, without let, molestation or hindrance.

TO LET. To hire, to lease; to grant the use and possession of something for a compensation.
     2. This term is applied to real estate and the words to hire are more commonly used when speaking of personal estate. See Hire, Hirer, and Letter.
     3. Letting is very similar to selling; the difference consists, in this; that instead of selling the thing itself, the letter sells only the use of it.

References in periodicals archive ?
Second, Shell lets drop the occasional Freudian suggestion, the purpose of which seems less to analyze than to scandalize.
As if to affirm the difficulty of overcoming what the editors refer to as "Euro-American standards set by the dominant discourse," Puschmann-Nalenz lets drop an all-too-familiar judgment when she archly proclaims Terry McMillan's introduction to Breaking Ice (1990) more wanting in "level[s] of abstraction" than Mary Helen Washington's introduction to Black-Eyed Susans (1975/1990).
To judge by comments he lets drop, Hodgson is among those who still think the causes of inflation are to be found among such things as crop failures.