lie

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lie

noun calumny, deceit, deception, distortion, false statement, falsehood, falsification, falsity, fiction, fraud, intentional distortion, intentional exaggeration, intentional misstatement, intentional untruth, invention, mendacity, mendacium, misrepresentation, misstatement, perversion, prevarication, untruth
Associated concepts: defamation, libel, perjury, polygraph test, slander

lie

(Be sustainable), verb be allowable, be appropriate, be available, be established, be evident, be fitting, be perrissible, be permitted, be possible, be proper, be suitable, be suited, be supportable, be warranted, exist, extend, stand

lie

(Falsify), verb be dishonest, be untruthful, bear false witness, belie, commit perjury, concoct, counterfeit, delude, deviate from the truth, dissimulate, fable, fabricate, falsify, fib, fool, forswear, invent, misguide, misinform, mislead, misrepresent, misstate, palter, perjure oneself, pervert, pretend, prevaricate, repreeent falsely, swear falsely, tell a falsehood, tell an untruth
Associated concepts: false testimony, lie detector, perjury
See also: bear false witness, canard, deceive, deception, equivocate, evade, fabricate, fake, false pretense, falsehood, falsify, fiction, figment, hoax, invent, misguide, mislead, misrepresent, misrepresentation, misstate, misstatement, palter, perjure, posture, pretend, pretense, pretext, prevaricate, rest, story, subterfuge

TO LIE. That which is proper, is fit; as, an action on the case lies for an injury committed without force; corporeal hereditaments lie in livery, that is, they pass by livery; incorporeal hereditaments lie in grant, that is, pass by the force of the grant, and without any livery. Vide Lying in grant.

References in periodicals archive ?
A survey by executive headhunters recently concluded that more than 40 percent of executives lied on their resumes.
The prosecution team will try to broaden its perjury case by charging that Clinton lied about other details, like when his relationship with Lewinsky began, the frequency of their meetings and the number of times they had sexually explicit telephone conversations.
The fourth article, abuse of power, alleges he sought to use his lawyers to ward off investigators and lied to the American public about his affair with Lewinsky.
And, indeed, an argument can be advanced that, in order to evaluate the president's behavior fairly, the public should know the extent to which those on the other side had sex and lied, or allowed their staff to continue to put out statements contradicting charges leveled at them by opponents.
The ten incidents (of sexual encounters) are recounted here because they are necessary to assess whether the President lied under oath, both in his civil deposition, where he denied any sexual relationship at all, and in his grand jury testimony, where he acknowledged an `inappropriate intimate contact' but denied any sexual contact with Ms.
Either Monica Lewinsky lied to the grand jury or President Clinton lied to the grand jury,'' the report said.
Starr's 445-page report asserts that Clinton lied during his civil deposition in the Paula Jones sexual misconduct lawsuit in January and during his grand jury testimony last month from the White House, three lawyers who insisted on anonymity said.
Researchers Rony Halevy, Bruno Verschuere and Shaul Shalvi surveyed 527 people to find out how often they had lied over the past 24 hours.
I often ask parents if they ever lied to their own parents when they were teenagers, and they will respond: "Of course, all the time.
The CareerBuilder survey indicated that 19% of workers admit they lied at the office at least once a week (Miller, 2007).
Blair says he lied to mask his lack of confidence in himself and feelings of inadequacy.
Looking at Americans by age, there's little difference when it comes to likelihood to have lied to a spouse or significant other.