line


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line

(Ancestry), noun arrangement, avenue, beat, birth, blood, bloodline, channel, communication, course, derivation, descent, direction, dispatch, drift, epistle, stock, genealogy, heredity, idea, lane, letter, lineage, method, missive, nature, note, origin, parentage, path, progeny, race, railroad, road, route, scheme, sort, succession, system, tendency, track, trail, transportation, way
Associated concepts: descendant, direct line, maternal line, paternal line

line

(Business), noun activity, airline, avocation, bus line, calling, career, chain, employment, livelihood, occupation, profession, pursuit, specialization, specialty, stock in trade, undertaking, vocation, work
See also: ancestry, birth, blood, bloodline, business, calling, career, chain, course, derivation, descent, direction, employment, family, lineage, merchandise, occupation, origin, parentage, policy, polity, post, posterity, progeny, pursuit, race, range, stock in trade, trade, work

LINE, descents. The series of persons who have descended from a common ancestor, placed one under the other, in the order of their birth. It connects successively all the relations by blood to each other. Vide Consanguinity; Degree.

 
³ A  ³
³ s  ³                     ÚÄ    6. Tritavus, Tritavia.
³ c  ³                     ÃÄ    5. Atavus, Atavia.
³ e  ³                     ÃÄ    4. Abavus, Abavia.
³ n  ³ Great grand-   ³    ³
³ d Ä´ father, great  ÃÄ   ÃÄ    3. Proavus, Proavia.
³ i  ³ grandmother,   ³    ³
³ n  ³                     ³
³ g  ³ Grand father,  ³    ³
³    ³ grandmother    ÃÄ   ÃÄ    2. Avus, Avia.
³ l  ³                     ³
³ i  ³ Father, mother      ÃÄ    1. Pater, Mater.
³ n  ³                     ³
³ e  ³                     ³

     EGO. ÃÄ EGO. ³ D ³ ³ ³ e ³ ³ ³ s ³ Son. ÃÄ 1. Filius. ³ c ³ Grandson ÃÄ 2. Nepos, Nepti. ³ e ³ Great Grandson. ÃÄ 3. Pronepos, Proneptis. ³ n ³ ÃÄ 4. Abnepos, Abneptis. ³ d ³ ÃÄ 5. Adnepos, Adneptis. ³ i ³ ÃÄ 6. Trinepos, Trineptis. ³ n ³ ³ g ³ ³ ³ ³ L ³ ³ i ³ ³ n ³ ³ e ³

     2. The line is either direct or collateral. The direct line is composed of all the persons who are descended from each other. If, in the direct line, any one person is assumed the propositus, in order to count from him upwards and downwards, the line will be divided into two parts, the ascending and descending lines. The ascending line is that, which counting from the propositus, ascends to his ancestors, to his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, &c. The descending line, is that which, counting from the same person, descends to his children, grandchildren, great-grand-children, &c. The preceding table is an example.
     3. The collateral line considered by itself, and in relation to the common ancestor, is a direct line; it becomes collateral when placed along side of another line below the common ancestor, in whom both lines unite for example:

     Common ancestor.
     O
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     Direct ³ ³ Collateral
     line. o o line.
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     O o
     Ego.

     4. These two lines are independent of each other; they have no connexion, except by their union in the person of the common ancestor. This reunion is what forms the relation among the persons composing the two lines.
     5. A line is also paternal or maternal. In the examination of a person's ascending line, the line ascends first to his father, next to his paternal grandfather, his paternal great-grandfather, &c. so on from father to father; this is called the paternal line. Another line will be found to ascend from the same person to his mother, his maternal grandmother, and so from mother to mother; this is the maternal line. These lines, however, do not take in all the ascendants, there are many others who must be imagined. The number of ascendants is double at each degree, as is shown by the following table:

     ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     F ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³ ³
     t ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³
     ÚÄÄOÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     P ³ O ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ t ³ ³
     t ³ h ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ r ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ ³ ³
     a ³ L ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ i ³
     ³ n ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     L ³ e ³ ³
     i ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ Ego. OÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ O ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ t ³
     a ³ h ÚÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ e ³ ³
     ³ r ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     l ³ ³ ³ ³
     i ³ l ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ i ³ ³
     e ³ n ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ e ³
     ÀÄÄÄoÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     o ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³ ³
     e ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o

     Vide 2 Bl. Com. 200, b. 2, c. 14; Poth. Des Successions, ch. 1, art. 3, Sec. 2; and article Ascendants.

LINE, measures. A line is a lineal measure containing the one twelfth part of a on inch.

LINE, estates. The division between two estates. Limit; border; boundary.
     2. When a line is mentioned in a deed as ending at a particular monument, (q.v.) it is to be extended in the direction called for, without regard to distance, until it reach the boundary. 1 Taylor, 110, 303 2 Hawks, 219; 3 Hawks, 21; 2 Taylor, 1. And a marked line is to be adhered to although it depart from the course. 7 Wheat. 7; 2 Overt. 304; 3 Call, 239; 7 Monr. 333; 2 Bibb, 261; 4 Bibb, 503; 4 Monr. 29; see further, 2 Dana, 2; 6 Wend. 467; 1 Bibb, 466; 1 Marsh. 382; 3 Marsh. 382; 3 Murph. 82; 13 Pick. 145; 13 Wend. 300; 5 J. J. Marsh. 587.
     3. Where a number of persons settle simultaneously or at short intervals in the same neighborhood, and their tracts, if extended in certain directions, would overlap each other, the settlers sometimes by agreement determine upon dividing lines, which are called consentible lines. These lines, when fairly agreed upon, have been sanctioned by the courts; and such agreements are conclusive upon all persons claiming under the parties to them with notice, but not upon bona fide purchasers for a valuable consideration without notice, actual or constructive. 5 S. & R. 273; 9 W. & S. 66; 3 S & R. 323; 5 Binn. 129; 10 Watts, 324; 17 S. &. R. 57; Jones, L. 0. T.
     4. Lines fixed by compact between nations are binding on their citizens and subjects. 11 Pet. 209; 1 Overt. 269; 1 Ves. sen., Rep. 450; 1 Atk. R. 2; 1 Ch. Cas. 85; 1 P. Wms. 723727; 2 Atk. R. 592; 1 Vern. 48; 1 Ves. 19; 2 Ves. 284; 3 S. & R. 331.

References in classic literature ?
Slowly the long line of derelicts, of birds of prey, of sorry, weak failures, passed before the seat of judgment.
So long as any of the race were to be found, they had been marked out from other men--not strikingly, nor as with a sharp line, but with an effect that was felt rather than spoken of--by an hereditary character of reserve.
This was to be not only the longest of all telephone lines, strung on ten thousand poles; it was to be a line de luxe, built of glistening red copper, not iron.
When we see a Line, we see something that is long and BRIGHT; BRIGHTNESS, as well as length, is necessary to the existence of a Line; if the brightness vanishes, the Line is extinguished.
The line from San Francisco to Sacramento runs in a north-easterly direction, along the American River, which empties into San Pablo Bay.
Furthermore, lines two and three, four and five, six and seven, have the same tones on the even syllables.
Later on I found in the hymn to the Pythian Apollo (which abounds with tags taken from the "Odyssey") a line ending
Farther up the line a man, standing behind a tree, had had his knee joint splintered by a ball.
The parts of a line bear a relative position to each other, for each lies somewhere, and it would be possible to distinguish each, and to state the position of each on the plane and to explain to what sort of part among the rest each was contiguous.
For a hundred years now no British fleet has engaged the enemy in line of battle.
Every line is an idea conveying either the beauty and playfulness of the fawn, or the artlessness of the maiden, or her love, or her admiration, or her grief, or the fragrance and warmth and appropriateness of the little nest-like bed of lilies and roses which the fawn devoured as it lay upon them, and could scarcely be distinguished from them by the once happy little damsel who went to seek her pet with an arch and rosy smile on her face.
They both get hold of the same bit of line, and pull at it in opposite directions, and wonder where it is caught.