lines


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References in classic literature ?
The draperies and fluttering things which she wore suited her rich, luxuriant beauty as a greater severity of line could not have done.
A gleam of exultation shot across the darkly-painted lineaments of the inhabitant of the forest, as he traced the route of his intended victims, who rode unconsciously onward, the light and graceful forms of the females waving among the trees, in the curvatures of their path, followed at each bend by the manly figure of Heyward, until, finally, the shapeless person of the singing master was concealed behind the numberless trunks of trees, that rose, in dark lines, in the intermediate space.
One of these paragraphs tells about a quarrel between the Czar of Russia and his eldest son, twenty-one and a half lines; and the other tells about the atrocious destruction of a peasant child by its parents, forty lines, or one-fifth of the total of the reading-matter contained in the paper.
Instead of legitimately extending telephone lines into communities that had none, these promoters proceeded to inflict the messy snarl of an overlapping system upon whatever cities would give them permission to do so.
Points, Lines, Squares, Cubes, Extra-Cubes -- we are all liable to the same errors, all alike the Slaves of our respective Dimensional prejudices, as one of your Spaceland poets has said,'One touch of Nature makes all worlds akin'.
Furthermore, lines two and three, four and five, six and seven, have the same tones on the even syllables.
36} The lines which I have enclosed in brackets are evidently an afterthought--added probably by the writer herself--for they evince the same instinctively greater interest in anything that may concern a woman, which is so noticeable throughout the poem.
Behind the lines these two were acting a little isolated scene.
Similarly you can find a common boundary in the case of the parts of a solid, namely either a line or a plane.
For a hundred years now no British fleet has engaged the enemy in line of battle.
But these lines, however good, do not bear with them much of the general character of the English antique.
After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers- fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs- near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.