performance

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Performance

The fulfillment or accomplishment of a promise, contract, or other obligation according to its terms.

Part performance entails the completion of some portion of what either party to a contract has agreed to do. With respect to the sale of goods, the payment—or receipt and acceptance of goods—makes an oral sales contract, otherwise unenforceable because of the Statute of Frauds, enforceable in regard to goods for which payment has been made and accepted or which have been received and accepted.

Specific Performance is an equitable doctrine that compels a party to execute the agreement according to its terms where monetary damages would be inadequate compensation for the breach of an agreement, as in the case of a sale of land. In regard to the sale of goods, a court orders specific performance only where the goods are unique or in other proper circumstances.

performance

n. fulfillment of one's obligations required by contract. Specific performance of a contract may be demanded in a lawsuit. Partial performance is short of full performance spelled out in the contract, but if the contract provided for a series of acts or deliveries with payment for each of the series, there may be partial recovery for what has been performed or delivered even if there is not full performance. (See: specific performance)

performance

(Execution), noun accomplished fact, accomplishment, achievement, act, action, attainment, carrying into effect, carrying through, commission, consummation, culmination, deed, enactment, finnshed product, fulfilment, implementation, operation, perpetration, production, realization, rendition, work
Associated concepts: full performance, impossibility of perrormance, partial performance, performance bond, prevennion of performance
Foreign phrases: Non quod dictum est, sed quod factum est inspicitur.Not what is said, but what is done, is to be regarded. Lex non cogit ad impossibilia. The law does not require the performance of the impossible.

performance

(Workmanship), noun ability, achievement, action, aptitude, aptness, ars, art, artfulness, artificium, attainment, caliber, capability, capacity, competence, competency, composition, construction, craft, craftsmanship, creation, dexterity, effort, endowment, expertness, faculty, finesse, formation, forte, handiness, handiwork, ingenuity, manipulation, mastership, mastery, operation, opus, play, preparation, production, proficiency, qualification, quality of execution, quality of work, representation, show, skill, skillfulness, technique, virtuosity, work, working ability
See also: act, conduct, course, finality, fruition, function, histrionics, infliction, operation, part, proceeding, process, realization, role, transaction, undertaking

PERFORMANCE. The act of doing something; the thing done is also called a performance; as, Paul is exonerated from the obligation of his contract by its performance.
     2. When it contract has been made by parol, which, under the statute of frauds and perjuries, could not be enforced, because it was not in writing, and the party seeking to avoid it, has received the whole or a part performance of such agreement, he cannot afterwards avoid it; 14 John. 15; S. C. 1 John. Ch. R. 273; and such part performance will enable the other party to prove it aliunde. 1 Pet. C. C. R. 380; 1 Rand. R. 165; 1 Blackf. R. 58; 2 Day, R. 255; 1 Desaus. R. 350; 5 Day, R. 67; 1 Binn. R. 218; 3 Paige, R. 545; 1 John. Ch. R. 131, 146. Vide Specific performance.

References in periodicals archive ?
Through the modification of tradition pronouns and phonetic features, genderqueer individuals in this community created gender ambiguous non-normative linguistic performances.
This unique combination of phonetic features is one more linguistic performance of non-normative gender performed by genderqueer individuals.
As the author of some of the most seductively challenging linguistic performances of our time, he makes it exceedingly difficult to answer the simplest questions about his work, such as the question asked a few months ago by my young daughter, who noticed The Tunnel among the books in my study and said, "What's that about?