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line

(Ancestry), noun arrangement, avenue, beat, birth, blood, bloodline, channel, communication, course, derivation, descent, direction, dispatch, drift, epistle, stock, genealogy, heredity, idea, lane, letter, lineage, method, missive, nature, note, origin, parentage, path, progeny, race, railroad, road, route, scheme, sort, succession, system, tendency, track, trail, transportation, way
Associated concepts: descendant, direct line, maternal line, paternal line

line

(Business), noun activity, airline, avocation, bus line, calling, career, chain, employment, livelihood, occupation, profession, pursuit, specialization, specialty, stock in trade, undertaking, vocation, work
See also: ancestry, birth, blood, bloodline, business, calling, career, chain, course, derivation, descent, direction, employment, family, lineage, merchandise, occupation, origin, parentage, policy, polity, post, posterity, progeny, pursuit, race, range, stock in trade, trade, work

LINE, descents. The series of persons who have descended from a common ancestor, placed one under the other, in the order of their birth. It connects successively all the relations by blood to each other. Vide Consanguinity; Degree.

 
³ A  ³
³ s  ³                     ÚÄ    6. Tritavus, Tritavia.
³ c  ³                     ÃÄ    5. Atavus, Atavia.
³ e  ³                     ÃÄ    4. Abavus, Abavia.
³ n  ³ Great grand-   ³    ³
³ d Ä´ father, great  ÃÄ   ÃÄ    3. Proavus, Proavia.
³ i  ³ grandmother,   ³    ³
³ n  ³                     ³
³ g  ³ Grand father,  ³    ³
³    ³ grandmother    ÃÄ   ÃÄ    2. Avus, Avia.
³ l  ³                     ³
³ i  ³ Father, mother      ÃÄ    1. Pater, Mater.
³ n  ³                     ³
³ e  ³                     ³

     EGO. ÃÄ EGO. ³ D ³ ³ ³ e ³ ³ ³ s ³ Son. ÃÄ 1. Filius. ³ c ³ Grandson ÃÄ 2. Nepos, Nepti. ³ e ³ Great Grandson. ÃÄ 3. Pronepos, Proneptis. ³ n ³ ÃÄ 4. Abnepos, Abneptis. ³ d ³ ÃÄ 5. Adnepos, Adneptis. ³ i ³ ÃÄ 6. Trinepos, Trineptis. ³ n ³ ³ g ³ ³ ³ ³ L ³ ³ i ³ ³ n ³ ³ e ³

     2. The line is either direct or collateral. The direct line is composed of all the persons who are descended from each other. If, in the direct line, any one person is assumed the propositus, in order to count from him upwards and downwards, the line will be divided into two parts, the ascending and descending lines. The ascending line is that, which counting from the propositus, ascends to his ancestors, to his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, &c. The descending line, is that which, counting from the same person, descends to his children, grandchildren, great-grand-children, &c. The preceding table is an example.
     3. The collateral line considered by itself, and in relation to the common ancestor, is a direct line; it becomes collateral when placed along side of another line below the common ancestor, in whom both lines unite for example:

     Common ancestor.
     O
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     Direct ³ ³ Collateral
     line. o o line.
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     o o
     ³ ³
     O o
     Ego.

     4. These two lines are independent of each other; they have no connexion, except by their union in the person of the common ancestor. This reunion is what forms the relation among the persons composing the two lines.
     5. A line is also paternal or maternal. In the examination of a person's ascending line, the line ascends first to his father, next to his paternal grandfather, his paternal great-grandfather, &c. so on from father to father; this is called the paternal line. Another line will be found to ascend from the same person to his mother, his maternal grandmother, and so from mother to mother; this is the maternal line. These lines, however, do not take in all the ascendants, there are many others who must be imagined. The number of ascendants is double at each degree, as is shown by the following table:

     ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³
     ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     F ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³ ³
     t ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³
     ÚÄÄOÄÄ´
     ³ ³
     P ³ O ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ t ³ ³
     t ³ h ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ r ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ ³ ³
     a ³ L ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ i ³
     ³ n ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     L ³ e ³ ³
     i ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ ³
     e ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ Ego. OÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     a ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     e ³ ³ ³
     r ³ O ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     n ³ t ³
     a ³ h ÚÄÄÄÄÄ´
     l ³ e ³ ³
     ³ r ³ ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     l ³ ³ ³ ³
     i ³ l ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     n ³ i ³ ³
     e ³ n ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ e ³
     ÀÄÄÄoÄÄ´
     ³
     M ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     o ³ ³
     t ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     h ³ ³ ³
     e ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o
     r ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ³ ÚÄÄÄÄÄ o
     ³ ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄoÄÄÄÄ´
     ³
     ÀÄÄÄÄÄ o

     Vide 2 Bl. Com. 200, b. 2, c. 14; Poth. Des Successions, ch. 1, art. 3, Sec. 2; and article Ascendants.

LINE, measures. A line is a lineal measure containing the one twelfth part of a on inch.

LINE, estates. The division between two estates. Limit; border; boundary.
     2. When a line is mentioned in a deed as ending at a particular monument, (q.v.) it is to be extended in the direction called for, without regard to distance, until it reach the boundary. 1 Taylor, 110, 303 2 Hawks, 219; 3 Hawks, 21; 2 Taylor, 1. And a marked line is to be adhered to although it depart from the course. 7 Wheat. 7; 2 Overt. 304; 3 Call, 239; 7 Monr. 333; 2 Bibb, 261; 4 Bibb, 503; 4 Monr. 29; see further, 2 Dana, 2; 6 Wend. 467; 1 Bibb, 466; 1 Marsh. 382; 3 Marsh. 382; 3 Murph. 82; 13 Pick. 145; 13 Wend. 300; 5 J. J. Marsh. 587.
     3. Where a number of persons settle simultaneously or at short intervals in the same neighborhood, and their tracts, if extended in certain directions, would overlap each other, the settlers sometimes by agreement determine upon dividing lines, which are called consentible lines. These lines, when fairly agreed upon, have been sanctioned by the courts; and such agreements are conclusive upon all persons claiming under the parties to them with notice, but not upon bona fide purchasers for a valuable consideration without notice, actual or constructive. 5 S. & R. 273; 9 W. & S. 66; 3 S & R. 323; 5 Binn. 129; 10 Watts, 324; 17 S. &. R. 57; Jones, L. 0. T.
     4. Lines fixed by compact between nations are binding on their citizens and subjects. 11 Pet. 209; 1 Overt. 269; 1 Ves. sen., Rep. 450; 1 Atk. R. 2; 1 Ch. Cas. 85; 1 P. Wms. 723727; 2 Atk. R. 592; 1 Vern. 48; 1 Ves. 19; 2 Ves. 284; 3 S. & R. 331.

References in classic literature ?
The lining had been of red silk, but was a good deal discoloured.
Look at the band of ribbed silk and the excellent lining.
The further points, that he is middle-aged, that his hair is grizzled, that it has been recently cut, and that he uses lime-cream, are all to be gathered from a close examination of the lower part of the lining.
Here," laughed Lebedeff, at last, rising to his full height and looking pleasantly at the prince, "here, in the lining of my coat.
It certainly felt as though it might well be the purse fallen through a hole in the pocket into the lining.
I've let it slip back into the lining now, as you see, and so I have been walking about ever since yesterday morning; it knocks against my legs when I walk along.
Yesterday we were sitting together in the tavern, and the lining of my coat was-- quite accidentally, of course--sticking out right in front.
Why, by the very fact that he put the purse prominently before you, first under the chair and then in your lining, he shows that he does not wish to deceive you, but is anxious to beg your forgiveness in this artless way.
Simply let him see that it is no longer in the lining of your coat, and form his own conclusions.
Some great baron's son, I doubt not," answered Little John, "with good and true men's money lining his purse.
For dress the insect wore a dark-blue swallowtail coat with a yellow silk lining and a flower in the button-hole; a vest of white duck that stretched tightly across the wide body; knickerbockers of fawn-colored plush, fastened at the knees with gilt buckles; and, perched upon its small head, was jauntily set a tall silk hat.
A single glance at the vessel's deck assured me that the battle was over and that we had been victorious, for I saw our survivors holding a handful of the enemy at pistol points while one by one the rest of the crew was coming out of the craft's interior and lining up on deck with the other prisoners.