literally


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literally

adverb correctly, definitely, distinctly, explicitly, expressly, precisely, rigidly, rigorous, specifically, unambiguously, uncompromisingly, unerringly
Associated concepts: laws read literally, strict construction
References in classic literature ?
We were beginning literally to die of heat, hunger and thirst.
This was the secret of my purchase, and the true reason why this lovely girl had literally expended her last sou in making it.
There he had to endure the bites of myriads of insects --gnats, mosquitoes, ants half an inch long, literally covered the ground; and, in less than two hours, Joe had not a rag remaining of the garments that had covered him, the insects having devoured them
I call it the library now, but then we called it the bookcase, and that was what literally it was, because I believe that whatever we had called our modest collection of books, it was a larger private collection than any other in the town where we lived.
From my ledge to the base of the cliff is a matter of several thousand feet of dangerous climbing; yet I venture to say that the first ape from whose loins my line has descended never could have equaled the speed with which I literally dropped down the face of that rugged escarpment.
In a quarter of an hour Old Sharon had extracted from the witness everything, literally everything down to the smallest detail, that Moody could tell him.
The startling contrast between the corpse-like pallor of her complexion and the overpowering life and light, the glittering metallic brightness in her large black eyes, held him literally spell-bound.
Lastly, particular care had been taken to secure a literally correct report of the evidence given by the various witnesses.
22) Literally, `you have made him sit on the floor', i.
Not visited by the surviving members of her family, living, literally, by herself in the world, Hester decided, in spite of her comfortable little income, on letting lodgings.
Literally "not to call them thine," but the Greek may be rendered "In order not to reveal thine.
This thought hath been carried so far, and is become so general, that some words proper to the theatre, and which were at first metaphorically applied to the world, are now indiscriminately and literally spoken of both; thus stage and scene are by common use grown as familiar to us, when we speak of life in general, as when we confine ourselves to dramatic performances: and when transactions behind the curtain are mentioned, St James's is more likely to occur to our thoughts than Drury-lane.