litigious


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litigious

adj. referring to a person who constantly brings or prolongs legal actions, particularly when the legal maneuvers are unnecessary or unfounded. Such persons often enjoy legal battles, controversy, the courtroom, the spotlight, use the courts to punish enemies, seek profit, and pursue minor matters which do not deserve judicial attention. Some of these people are called "professional plaintiffs."

litigious

adjective actionable, aggressive, antagonistic, arguing, argumental, argumentative, at variance, bellicose, belligerent, combative, conflicting, contentious, contested, contrary, controversial, controvertible, debatable, discordant, disposed to controversy, disputable, disputative, dissentious, eristic, eristical, exceptious, fighting, given to disputation, hostile, inimical, irreconcilable, litigatory, litigiosus, militant, offensive, open to debate, open to question, opposing, polemic, polemical, pugnacious, quarrelsome, querulous, unpeaceful, warlike
Associated concepts: barratry
See also: actionable, argumentative, contentious, forensic

litigious

1 excessively ready to go to law.
2 of or relating to litigation.

LITIGIOUS. That which is the subject of a suit or action; that which is contested in a court of justice. In another sense, litigious signifies a disposition to sue; a fondness for litigation.

References in periodicals archive ?
As nursing homes continue to face litigious attacks, associations like ASHRM emphasize the importance of employing quality risk-management strategies in long-term care.
We don't need any more headstrong, litigious lawyers; we've been groaning under the weight of carpers and cavillers for years.
Corynne McSherry throws the spotlight on this issue, examining the clash between the cultural "gift" economy of traditional academia and the increasingly litigious commercial economy.
This device eliminates the use of less reliable means, such as rubber bands and tape, and may reduce risk in today's litigious environment.
This combination of lost trust in physicians and publicity surrounding miracle cures played a large part in the development of the litigious society in which we live.
I am not a litigious person, but the fact is that very often class action lawsuits are the only way to get companies to alter their business practices: hit 'em where it hurts, in the pocketbook.
John Soane was quarrelsome, paranoid, unbalanced and litigious, constantly falling out with old and loyal friends and entirely lacking in self-knowledge and a sense of humour.
That is apparently the view of Larry Klayman, the litigious right-wing lawyer who has filed forty-three lawsuits against various Clintonites.
Philosophy [science] is such an impertinently litigious lady that a man had as good be engaged in law suits as have to do with her," Newton wrote.
F argues that she did not know about any of the taxes when she made the disbursements: she was "estranged" from J; they were involved in contentious and litigious divorce proceedings; and she generally knew nothing about J's finances.
In our increasingly litigious culture, might he not someday find himself defendant in a lawsuit generated by a disgruntled purchaser?