lockout

(redirected from lockouts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Lockout

Employer's withholding of work from employees in order to gain concession from them; it is the employers' counterpart of the employee's strike. Refusal by the employer to furnish available work to its regular employees, whether refusal is motivated by the employer's desire to protect itself against economic injury, by its desire to protect itself at the bargaining table, or by both.

Cross-references

Labor Law; Labor Union.

lockout

noun barring out, cessation of employyent, cessation of the furnishing of work, close-out, coorcive refusal to furnish work, employer work stoppage, exclusion of workers, nonadmission of employees, preclusion of work, refusal to furnish work, repudiation of employment, stoppage of work, temporary closing, work stoppage
Associated concepts: strike
See also: ostracism
References in periodicals archive ?
But league officials are optimistic about where the league could escalate given the potential for a television contract granted there's an NFL lockout.
147 energy isolation requirements to easily implement a compliant, hazardous energy control and lockout program throughout their facilities -- all within the same enterprise asset management system used to manage their asset maintenance.
The regulation of strikes and lockouts had, up until the passage of the Labour Relations Act 1987, been governed by a convoluted mix of English common law and various statutory provisions originating a century or so back.
However, last year another locksmith set himself up within a mile of us trading as Lockout 1.
The Pacific Maritime Association (PMA), which represents employers, locked about 10,500 union longshoremen out of port facilities, alleging the lockout was in response to widespread work slowdowns by members of The International Longshore & Warehouse Union.
Most companies, including those that try to plan for every contingency, do not have well-ordered plans for managing the operational, security, and logistical problems safe or vault lockouts can cause.
Made from durable moulded plastic and available in four colours, the lockout is also fully dielectric, highly resistant to solvent and other chemical products, and highly resistant to cracking and abrasion.
It would be of interest to compare the Australian experience of lockouts with the experience of other countries.
In front of a backdrop of placards that read ``Stop Corporate Greed,'' members of Locals 13, 63, and 94 stood and clapped as Local 13 President Joe Donato decried the lockout as a sign of things to come.
Congressman Green talked about the human suffering caused by the lockout, and about the courage of union workers fighting back through their boycott effort.
In the June 2004 edition of this Journal, Briggs (2004a) presented new information on lockouts in Australia.
The act specifies 17 different defenses, including lockouts as well as labor strikes, said Robert Force, co-director of the Maritime Law Center at Tulane University.