latency

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Related to logic bomb: Macro virus, RFC 1157

latency

noun behind the scenes, below the surface, camouflaged, concealed, covered, hidden from view, not manifested, screened, submerged, unapparent, under the surface, underlying, undetected, undeveloped, unexposed, unnoticed, unrevealed, unseen, veiled
Associated concepts: toll the statute of limitations
See also: cessation, inaction
References in periodicals archive ?
Alaid off tech support employee at this family-owned restaurant technology and management company launched a semi-successful logic bomb attack that crashed 25 computers and cost the company thousands of dollars to clean up.
Where do I personally stand with regard to legislation against viruses, logic bombs, and other forms of computer abuse?
In addition, organizations should disable computer access following terminations; enforce comprehensive password policies, computer account management practices, and layered security for remote access; use configuration management practices for detection of logic bombs and malicious code; and monitor system logging, as well as backup and recovery procedures.
Transnational criminals, terrorists and intelligence services are learning about and using viruses, Trojan horses, worms, logic bombs and eavesdropping sniffers that can intercept, destroy, degrade or deny access to data.
Computer viruses, logic bombs, Trojan horses and worms: A computer virus can be implanted in an exchange and spread to exchange members.
Hackers, either state-sponsored or working independently, will use computer viruses such as worms, Trojan horses, logic bombs, and electronic bacteria to damage or destroy information.
The term virus includes variants, such as logic bombs (logic codes that turn on at prespecified times), worms (routines that overwrite existing memory), and Trojan Horses (viruses inhabiting legitimate software programs).
It also identifies any logic bombs hidden in the malware waiting for a trigger to cause damage at a later time.
Other destructive computer codes include the Trojan horse (which is a code that looks harmless but can cause problems once it gets into a system), logic bombs (which typically are the destructive codes embedded in vir-uses) and worms, which are much like viruses but have their own engines.