lonely

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References in classic literature ?
At almost any other moment of her life she would have refused such proffered aid and company, as she had refused them several times before; and now the loneliness would not of itself have forced her to do otherwise.
I find talking so difficult; but loneliness frightens me.
Her feeling of loneliness became more pronounced, and she felt tired.
His throat was afflicted by rigid spasms, his mouth opened, and in a heart-broken cry bubbled up his loneliness and fear, his grief for Kiche, all his past sorrows and miseries as well as his apprehension of sufferings and dangers to come.
The naked earth, which so shortly before had been so populous; thrust his loneliness more forcibly upon him.
The loneliness of the man is slowly being borne in upon me.
This loneliness is bad enough in itself, but, to make it worse, he is oppressed by the primal melancholy of the race.
His friends caused him many disappointments, which were the more bitter to him, inasmuch as he regarded friendship as such a sacred institution; and for the first time in his life he realised the whole horror of that loneliness to which, perhaps, all greatness is condemned.
At all events he resolved to distribute this manuscript production, of which only forty copies were printed, only among those who had proved themselves worthy of it, and it speaks eloquently of his utter loneliness and need of sympathy in those days, that he had occasion to present only seven copies of his book according to this resolution.
It's rich to feel the touch of the one you love, to see the faces around of those you've given birth to, to move on through the days and nights towards the end, with them around; not to know the chill loneliness of an empty life.
Maggie's sense of loneliness, and utter privation of joy, had deepened with the brightness of advancing spring.
She rebelled against her lot, she fainted under its loneliness, and fits even of anger and hatred toward her father and mother, who were so unlike what she would have them to be; toward Tom, who checked her, and met her thought or feeling always by some thwarting difference,--would flow out over her affections and conscience like a lava stream, and frighten her with a sense that it was not difficult for her to become a demon.