lot


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Lot

In sales, a parcel or single article that is the subject matter of a separate sale or delivery, irrespective of whether or not it is adequate to perform the contract. In the Securities and commodities market, a specific number of shares or a particular quantity of a commodity specified for trading. In the law of real estate, one of several parcels into which real property is divided.

A lot is ordinarily one of several contiguous pieces of land of which a block is composed. Real property is commonly described in terms of lot and block numbers on recorded maps and plats.

lot

noun parcel, part, piece, piece of ground, plot, portion, small parcel of land, subdivision, tract
Associated concepts: adjacent lots, block, building lot, conniguous lots, partition of lots, vacant lot
See also: assemblage, bulk, conglomeration, entirety, land, lottery, parcel, plight, plot, posture, predetermination, property, quantity, real estate, situation

LOT. Anything on which depends the accidental determination of a right by which we acquire or lose something; or it is that which fortuitously determines what we are to acquire. When it can be certainly known what are our rights, we ought never to resort to a decision by lot; but when it is impossible to tell what actually belong to us, as if an estate is divided into three parts and one part given to each of three persons, the proper way to ascertain each one's part is to draw lots. Wolff, Dr. &c., de la Nat. Sec. 669.

References in classic literature ?
It makes me think of English places that you read about, for there are hedges and walls and gates that lock, and lots of separate little houses for the gardeners and people.
They had been taught to read and write, diligently instructed in the truths of religion, and their lot had been as happy an one as in their condition it was possible to be.
And thus he goes on, from dish to dish, like a boy after a butterfly which just misses getting caught every time it alights, but somehow doesn't get caught after all; and at the end the exile and the boy have fared about alike; the one is full, but grievously unsatisfied, the other has had plenty of exercise, plenty of interest, and a fine lot of hopes, but he hasn't got any butterfly.
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife with- out any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some mon- strous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn't have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg.
He never made any bones about his own case; said he'd been a hard lot, was a hard lot yet, and reckoned he'd be a hard lot plumb to the end.
Tha' has done a lot o' work for such a little wench," he said, looking her over.
And he kept on getting still more pets; and of course it cost a lot to feed them.
Caverly was what the world of New York, in 1832, called poor; that is to say, he had no known bank-stock, did not own a lot on the island, was director of neither bank nor insurance company, and lived in a modest two-story house, in White street.
As they were speaking, Nestor knight of Gerene shook the helmet, and from it there fell the very lot which they wanted--the lot of Ajax.
They are a deal of trouble, and they make a place untidy and they cost a lot of money to keep; but still you would not have the house without them.
In the third place, different laws of each community may be adopted; as, for instance, as it seems correspondent to the nature of a democracy, that the magistrates should be chosen by lot, but an aristocracy by vote, and in the one state according to a census, but not in the other: let, then, an aristocracy and a free state copy something from each of them; let them follow an oligarchy in choosing their magistrates by vote, but a democracy in not admitting of any census, and thus blend together the different customs of the two governments.
What a lot of those Frenchies were taken today, and the fact is that not one of them had what you might call real boots on," said a soldier, starting a new theme.