lowness


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In addition, for some caters, this resulted in feelings of lowness, "helplessness," and lack of acceptance of some behaviors; however, there was also evidence of positive changes in their personal and family relationships.
but also view poverty as a result of a lack or lowness of multiple resource variables.
Its huge garden was blooming with multi-coloured flowers, archways, well- trimmed lowness.
Sen (1999) posited that "poverty must be seen as the deprivation of basic capabilities rather than merely as lowness of income, which is the standard criterion of identification of poverty.
Data were normalized by global, lowness, print-tip, and scaled normalization for data reliability.
It is analogous to the opportunistic, interest-driven use of the term "mob" by authoritarian regimes in description of anti-regime protests, though -- or perhaps because -- the term implies, as one scholar pointed out, "gullibility, fickleness, herd-prejudice, [and] lowness of state and habit.
A person affected with debility, lowness of spirits or melancholy.
In a recent study, male and female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes raised the pitch, or highness or lowness, of their whine when they came within earshot of the opposite sex.
The lowness of the stool made for my body, the security and warmth of Mama' s kitchen, the smell of the lilacs, the sound of the music, and, since it would be good to have all of my senses engaged, the taste of a peach, perhaps, afterward.
Clear out deadwood:Sir - It would be nice to say the only way is up from here, but I now believe the Welsh international rugby game still has new depths of lowness to sink.
In regular usage, "pitch" can designate (a) the highness or lowness of voiced or musical sounds measured by intensity of vibration, and (b) the course of a hurled object.