luxury

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luxury

noun accessory, added comfort, added connenience, added creature toy, added enjoyment, added pleasure, added state-of-the-art edition added technologgcal advancement, advantage, delight, delightfulness, ease of comfort, extra, extravagance, frill, gadgetry, newest product, nicety, nonessential, option, physical pleasure
Associated concepts: luxury tax
See also: prosperity
References in periodicals archive ?
The letter, written on his first day on board the ship, also describes in detail Millet's view of the Titanic and its luxuriousness.
In the time of the Empire, baths of maximum size and luxuriousness had an important role in the social life of Rome.
Pedulla's argues that Rome's military success removed all the external threats that constrained Roman citizens to preserve their hereditary virtues, so they gave in to luxuriousness.
He won't be compromising the luxuriousness of the product by launching a low-fat or healthy option.
Not entirely joking, I said to check out the lifeboats before embarking and, periodically, to scan the horizon for icebergs (when they booked, some wit compared the ship's luxuriousness to the Titanic's), but I didn't worry overmuch: the odds against escaping from a sinking ship aren't too awful.
transformation whereby colour serves as a metonym for luxuriousness,
What happens at that moment in the history of poetry is that something like an aesthetic economism is formulated, incipient but unmistakable, polemical from the outset, which enables poets to argue that a rise in aesthetic luxuriousness (manifest primarily in "classicist" syntactical organization and diction conspicuously allusive to classical authors) equals a drop in political sagacity.
The luxuriousness of a car could be seen from the cylinder capacity or price.
WIRED magazine recently announced the results of a poll concerning hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), which indicates consumers find conventional vehicles superior in price (68 percent), driving performance (65 percent) and luxuriousness (51 percent).
As Catherine Hall (1992) explains, "[middle-class] critiques of the degeneracy and effeminacy of the aristocracy focused on its softness, sensuousness, indolence, luxuriousness, foppishness, and lack of a proper sense of purpose and direction" (p.
She teaches us about the luxuriousness of balsam stored in a tin jar (p.