make

(redirected from made)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

make

v. 1) to create something. 2) to sign a check, promissory note, bill of exchange or some other note which guarantees, promises or orders payment of money. (See: maker, check, promissory note, bill of exchange)

make

verb accomplish, achieve, actualize, assemble, attain, author, beget, bring about, bring forth, bring into being, bring into existence, bring to effect, bring to pass, build, call into being, call into existence, carry into effect, carry into execution, cast, cause, cause to exist, coin, complete, compose, compound, concoct, constitute, constrain, construct, contrive, creare, create, develop, draft, draw up, effect, effectuate, efform, enact, engender, erect, establish, evolve, execute, fabricari, fabricate, facere, fashion, force, forge, form, formulate, frame, generate, give birth to, give origin to, give rise to, hammer out, hatch, have in production, improvise, initiate, institute, invent, kindle, machine, manufacture, model, mold, organize, originate, pattern, perform, piece together, prepare, produce, provide, put together, set up, shape, synthesize, think up, turn out, yield results
Associated concepts: make a decision, make a demand, make a motion, make an agreement, make an offer
See also: acquire, build, cause, color, compel, complexion, constrain, create, enforce, fabricate, forge, form, frame, gain, generate, impose, kind, manner, manufacture, occasion, originate, press, produce, realize, receive, require, style

TO MAKE. English law. To perform or execute; as to make his law, is to perform that law which a man had bound himself to do; that is, to clear himself of an action commenced against him, by his oath, and the oaths of his neighbors. Old Nat. Br. 161. To make default, is to fail to appear in proper time. To make oath, is to swear according to the form prescribed by law.

References in classic literature ?
Now I carried everything into the cave, and began to furnish my house, and set up some pieces of boards like a dresser, to order my victuals upon; but boards began to be very scarce with me; also, I made me another table.
All this time I worked very hard, the rains hindering me many days, nay, sometimes weeks together; but I thought I should never be perfectly secure till this wall was finished; and it is scarce credible what inexpressible labour everything was done with, especially the bringing piles out of the woods and driving them into the ground; for I made them much bigger than I needed to have done.
He could scarcely read, wrote even his name with difficulty, and he had a violent temper which sometimes made him behave like a crazy man--tore him all to pieces and actually made him ill.
I remember one funny story about himself that made grandmother, who was working her bread on the bread-board, laugh until she wiped her eyes with her bare arm, her hands being floury.
A stay of one day will be made here, and the voyage continued to Madeira, which will be reached in about three days.
A call will be made at Bermuda, which lies directly in this route homeward, and will be reached in about ten days from Madeira, and after spending a short time with our friends the Bermudians, the final departure will be made for home, which will be reached in about three days.
He would not let her get up to dinner, but fed her himself, and then forgot his own while he sat watching her fall into a drowse, for Aunt Plenty's cordial made her sleepy.
The proper arrangements being made for the reception of Captain Black, that officer caused his ship's boats to be manned, and landed with befitting state at Astoria.
No, no," says he, "I mean it is a house all made of China ware, such as you call it in England, or as it is called in our country, porcelain.
Oh, the past--so much made up of Ralph; and now, as she saw, made up of something strange and false and other than she had thought it.
He had made up his mind to try a few hardy guesses, in mapping out his theory of the origin and motive of the murder-- guesses designed to fill up gaps in it--guesses which could help if they hit, and would probably do no harm if they didn't.
Let us draw a ship into the sea--one that has never yet made a voyage--and man her with two and fifty of our smartest young sailors.