magistracy

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magistracy

1 the office or function of a MAGISTRATE.
2 magistrates collectively.
3 the district under the jurisdiction of a magistrate.

MAGISTRACY, mun. law. In its most enlarged signification, this term includes all officers, legislative, executive, and judicial. For example, in most of the state constitutions will be found this provision; "the powers of the government are divided into three distinct departments, and each of these is confided to a separate magistracy, to wit: those which are legislative, to one; those which are executive, to another; and those which are judiciary, to another." In a more confined sense, it signifies the body of officers whose duty it is to put the laws in force; as, judges, justices of the peace, and the like. In a still narrower sense it is employed to designate the body of justices of peace. It is also used for the office of a magistrate.

References in periodicals archive ?
While withholding from the Bigallo the funds needed to perform its duties, all three Dukes passed some of its duties over to other magistracies.
They deliberately passed the Bigallo's mandated duties on to other magistracies under their more direct control at particular points in the 1550s, 1560s, 1570s, 1590s, and in 1620 (when the long-envisioned poorhouse was finally opened under state control).
Beyond lineage, the prerequisite for political participation in Ducal Tuscany was personal membership in the Council of 200, the assembly drawn from those who had passed scrutiny for magistracies.
Here, I include those things that they have not by the law of their own magistracies but specifically by a statute or institution (1.
At that time, it was always possible for a higher magistrate who yields power to exercise this power along with the other magistrates because he still would retain it among all the temporal and entrusted magistracies who would exercise the entrusted jurisdiction not in their name but in the name of the one who yielded the power.
His case study of the small Friulian town of Buia shows how the town preserved a degree of liberty as it navigated the interstices between local oligarchs and "the conflicting jurisdictions and competing powers" of Venetian officials and magistracies (158).