malefactor

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malefactor

noun bandit, brigand, convict, criminal, culprit, delinquent, desperado, evildoer, felon, gangster, hardened criminal, homo maleficus, homo sceleratus, hoodlum, hooligan, lawbreaker, lawless individual, miscreant, misdemeanant, offender, offender against the law, outlaw, racketeer, rapscallion, rascal, reprobate, rogue, ruffian, scamp, scoundrel, trespasser, villain, violator of laws, wrongdoer
See also: convict, criminal, delinquent, embezzler, felon, hoodlum, lawbreaker, offender, outlaw, racketeer, recidivist, wrongdoer

MALEFACTOR. He who bas been guilty of some crime; in another sense, one who has been convicted of having committed a crime.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rather we should strive to unearth the principles behind the Third Amendment's text as inspired by those malefactions.
I have heard That guilty creatures sitting at a play Have by the very cunning of the scene Been struck so to the soul that presently They have proclaimed their malefactions.
Under these circumstances, I suppose we should count ourselves lucky that the malefactions of Bill Clinton are not among those that the media are inclined to take very seriously.
But since the cultural right has declined, to date, to engage in any criticism of (or even admit to) its excesses and demonstrable malefactions, one wonders if Graff's opponents can meet the intellectual standard he has set, and one hopes that Tuttleton's response will not prove to be representative of conservatives and traditionalists in general.
Hum -- I have heard That guilty creatures sitting at a play Have, by the very cunning of the scene, Been struck so to the soul that presently They have proclaim'd their malefactions.
The stories run on, many of them discretefootnotes to history, some laced together with Seldes's still-powerful anger about the malefactions and distortions of the press through much of this century: major newspaper correspondents who suppressed stories about the murder that enabled Mussolini to take power; the consummate failure of the press to characterize fairly the Franco revolt in Spain or fully report the extent of the fascist support he had; the suppression of the record of Hungary's controversial Joseph Cardinal Mindszenty, who became a cold war hero of the right and whose anti-Semitism and collaboration with the Germans in World War II was ignored.
Such a proscription leads Wachtel to concentratc his attention upon particular malefactions and malefactors-the supranational banking system, the Big Banks, the money mandarins.
The notion that a criminal should atone for his malefactions is seen as a throw-back to barbaric times.
I HAVE HEARD THAT GUILTY CREATURES sitting at a play/Have been struck so by the cunning of the scene that present/ They have proclaimed their malefactions.