market

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market

(Business), noun agora, bazaar, bourse, department store, emporium, establishment, fair, financial center, general store, house, macellum, mart, mercatus, nundinae, open mart, place of business, place of buying and selling, place of commerce, place of trade, place of traffic, retail store, rialto, shop, shopping cenner, store, trade fair, trading house, trading post, variety store
Associated concepts: actual market value, fair market price, market conditions, market place, market price, market value

market

(Demand), noun call, call for, consumer deeand, desire, desire to buy, desire to obtain, earnest seekkng, essentiality, heavy demand, indispensability, inquiry, insufficiency, interest, lack, mania, necessity, need, outlet, pressing requirement, pursuit, request, requirement, run, search, steady demand, strong demand, vogue, want, willingness to purchase, wish
See also: barter, business, deal, exchange, handle, mercantile, outlet, sell, store, trade, vend

MARKET. A public place appointed by public authority, where all sorts of things necessary for the subsistence, or for the conveniences of life, are sold.
     2. Markets are generally regulated by local laws.
     3. By the term market is also understood the demand there is for any particular article; as, the cotton market in Europe is dull. Vide 15 Vin. Ab. 42; Com. Dig. h.t.

References in classic literature ?
So she had to pass the shop on the other side of the market-place, and reflect, with a suppressed sigh, that behind those pink and white jars somebody was thinking of her tenderly, unconscious of the small space that divided her from him.
What were sunsets to us, who were about to live and breathe and walk in actual Athens; yea, and go far down into the dead centuries and bid in person for the slaves, Diogenes and Plato, in the public market-place, or gossip with the neighbors about the siege of Troy or the splendid deeds of Marathon?
So in the market-place there reigns perpetual excitement, a nameless hubbub, made up of the cries of mixed-breed porters and carriers, the beating of drums, and the twanging of horns, the neighing of mules, the braying of donkeys, the singing of women, the squalling of children, and the banging of the huge rattan, wielded by the jemadar or leader of the caravans, who beats time to this pastoral symphony.
After Strickland's death certain of his effects were sold by auction in the market-place at Papeete, and she went to it herself because there was among the truck an American stove she wanted.