suit

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Suit

A generic term, of comprehensive signification, referring to any proceeding by one person or persons against another or others in a court of law in which the plaintiff pursues the remedy that the law affords for the redress of an injury or the enforcement of a right, whether at law or in Equity.

suit

n. generic term for any filing of a complaint (or petition) asking for legal redress by judicial action, often called a "lawsuit." In common parlance a suit asking for a court order for action rather than a money judgment is often called a "petition," but technically it is a "suit in equity." (See: lawsuit)

suit

noun actio, action, action at law, action to serve justice, case, causa, cause, cause in court, judicial contest, lawsuit, legal action, legal proceeding, legal remedy, lis, petition, proceeding, suit in law, trial
Associated concepts: class suits, nonsuit, suit against state
Foreign phrases: Secta est pugna civilis; sicut actores arrantur actionibus, et, quasi, accinguntur gladiis, ita rei muniuntur exceptionibus, et defenduntur, quasi, clypeis.A suit is a civil battle; for as the plaintiffs are armed with actions, and, as it were, girded with swords, so the defendants are fortified with pleas, and are deeended, as it were, with shields. Frustra agit qui judiiium prosequi nequit cum effectu. He sues vainly who cannot prosecute his judgment with effect. Nemo alieno nomine lege agere potest. No one can sue in the name of another.
See also: accommodate, action, agree, appeal, calculate, call, case, cause, chain, claim, clothe, comply, comport, concur, conform, entreaty, fulfill, lawsuit, legal proceeding, matter, proceeding, prosecution, satisfy, trial

suit

a civil proceeding.

SUIT. An action. The word suit in the 25th section of the judiciary act of 1789, applies to any proceeding in a court of justice, in which the plaintiff pursues, in such court, the remedy which the law affords him. An application for a prohibition is therefore a suit. 2 Pet. 449. According to the code of practice of Louisiana, art. 96, a suit is a real, personal or mixed demand, made before a competent judge, by which the parties pray to obtain their rights, and a decision of their disputes. In that acceptation, the words suit, process and cause, are in that state almost synonymous. Vide Secta, and Steph. Pl. 427; 3 Bl. Com. 395; Gilb. C. P. 48; 1 Chit. Pl. 399; Wood's Civ. Law, b. 4, c. p. 315; 4 Mass. 263; 18 John. 14; 4 Watts, R. 154; 3 Story, Const. Sec. 1719. In its most extended sense, the word suit, includes not only a civil action, but also a criminal prosecution, as indictment, information, and a conviction by a magistrate. Ham. N. P. 270.

References in classic literature ?
The second mast was yet standing, with the rags of a rent sail, and a wild confusion of broken cordage flapping to and fro.
It had been a great vessel of three masts but had lain so long exposed to the injuries of the weather that it was hung about with great webs of dripping seaweed, and on the deck of it shore bushes had taken root and now flourished thick with flowers.
But the breeze, far from lessening its force, blew as if to bend the mast, which, however, the metallic lashings held firmly.
Therefore, take me and bind me to the crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright, with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash the rope's ends to the mast itself.
After that, I took the tin off myself, and hammered at it with the mast till I was worn out and sick at heart, whereupon Harris took it in hand.
If there had been one mast standing, something high up to which to fasten blocks and tackles
Two more ships, being driven from their anchors, were run out of the Roads to sea, at all adventures, and that with not a mast standing.
By way of beguiling the tediousness of these banquets, a select association was formed at the lower end of the table, below the mast, to whose distinguished president modesty forbids me to make any further allusion, which, being a very hilarious and jovial institution, was (prejudice apart) in high favour with the rest of the community, and particularly with a black steward, who lived for three weeks in a broad grin at the marvellous humour of these incorporated worthies.
We put everything straight, stepped the long-boat's mast for our skipper, who was in charge of her, and I was not sorry to sit down for a moment.
Its masts trembled down to their stepping holes, and the clouds of smoke could hardly find way out of the narrow funnels.
It might have been even heavier, but, as it happened, we did not run our ship ashore, nor did we knock a large hole in the big ship whose lower masts were painted white.
The masts and spars, therefore, being linked to the wreck by the shrouds and the rigging, remained alongside for four days.