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Master

An individual who hires employees or servants to perform services and who directs the manner in which such services are performed.A court officer appointed by a judge to perform such jobs as examining witnesses, taking testimony, computing damages, or taking oaths, affidavits, or acknowledgments of deeds.

A master makes a report of his or her findings to the judge so a decree can be formulated. A master in chancery was an officer in Chancery Court in England. In the U. S. these duties may be rendered by a court clerk, commissioner, auditor, or referee.

master

n. 1) employer, in the area of law known as "master and servant," which more properly should be called employer and employee. 2) a person, supposedly with special expertise, appointed by a judge to investigate a problem (such as whether a parent's home is appropriate for child visitation) and report back to the judge his/her findings and recommendation. (See: master and servant, employment, respondeat superior)

master

adjective arch, authoritative, capital, central, chief, commanding, controlling, crowning, dictating, eminent, foremost, governing, great, head, hegemonic, hegemonical, incomparable, influential, leading, main, most important, outstanding, paramount, predominating, prepotent, prevailing, prevalent, primary, prime, recognized, regnant, reigning, ruling, sovereign, star, stellar, supereminent, supreme, top-flight, well-known
Associated concepts: agency, master and servant
See also: absolute, apprehend, attain, command, comprehend, construe, defeat, director, dominant, dominate, employer, expert, gain, govern, impose, manage, mastermind, moderate, overcome, oversee, overthrow, overwhelm, paramount, pass, pedagogue, perceive, predominate, prevail, principal, professional, proprietor, remember, repress, rule, sovereign, specialist, subdue, subject, subjugate, succeed, superintendent, surmount, understand

master

1 a nearly obsolete term for an EMPLOYER under a contract of employment in the sense of service rather than for services. The law was treated under the title ‘master and servant’ but is now usually collected under the title ‘employment law’, which includes much to do with trade unions. See EMPLOYMENT, UNFAIR DISMISSAL.
2 an officer of the Supreme Court of Judicature subordinate to a judge.

MASTER. This word has several meanings. 1. Master is one who has control over a servant or apprentice. A master stands in relation to his apprentices, in loco parentis, and is bound to fulfill that relation, which the law generally enforces. He is also entitled to be obeyed by his apprentices, as if they were his children. Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.
     2.-2. Master is one who is employed in teaching children, known generally as a schoolmaster; as to his powers, see Correction.
     3.-3. Master is the name of an officer: as, the ship Benjamin Franklin, whereof A B is master; the master of the rolls; master in chancery, &c.
     4.-4. By master is also understood a principal who employs another to perform some act or do something for him. The law having adopted the maxim of the civil law, qui facit per alium facit per se; the agent is but an instrument, and the master is civilly responsible for the act of his agent, as if it were his own, when he either commands him to do an act, or puts him in a condition, of which such act is a result, or by the absence of due care and control, either previously in the choice of his agent, or immediately in the act itself, negligently suffers him to do an injury. Story, Ag. Sec. 454, note; Noy's Max. c. 44; Salk. 282; 1 East. R. 106; 1 Bos. & Pul. 404; 2 H. Bl. 267; 5 Barn. & Cr. 547; 2 Taunt. R. 314; 4 Taunt. R. 649; Mass. 364, 385; 17 Mass. 479, 509; 1 Pick. 47 5; 4 Watts, 222; 2 Harr. & Gill., 316; 6 Cowen, 189; 8 Pick. 23; 5 Munf. 483. Vide Agent; Agency; Driver; Servant.

References in periodicals archive ?
The change to the new master switch will be done free of cost to the vehicle owner.
KLF14 seems to act as a master switch controlling processes that connect changes in the behavior of subcutaneous fat to disturbances in muscle and liver that contribute to diabetes and other conditions," said Mark McCarthy from Britain's Oxford University, who also worked on the study.
Tim Wu is a professor at Columbia Law School whose passion for his important subject infuses The Master Switch with energy (incidentally, he's currently on leave and serving as a senior adviser at the Federal Trade Commission).
Wu's central claim in The Master Switch is that information industries evolve toward "closed," corporate-controlled, anti-consumer systems.
The only problem was the exterior-lights master switch was left in the off position.
Topics included fuel-tank locations, fuel lines and sumps, how to remove and open cowlings, how to enter the aircraft, fuel cutoffs, master switch and battery locations, seat belt and harness releases, and seat removals, as well as exit windows, oxygen bottles, and rocket powered recovery systems.
A THE simplest option is to replace your master switch with a dimmer switch.
Energy conservation achieved by high-efficiency ballasts and daylight dimming systems will be augmented by providing each apartment with a master switch enabling tenants to turn off all nonessential lights when leaving home.
They believe this gene or a master switch controlling this gene is a key process in how Salmonella lives in animals.
The substitution of Ian Ferguson for pounds 70,000 new boy Gary Teale after 65 minutes was a master switch because it led to the goal that finally clinched victory.
While offering many of design motifs of the traditional roll-top desk, the unit also blends state-of-the-art design in the form of wire management ports, a master switch that turns on all electronic devices with the flip of one switch, a multi-outlet power bar and built-in modular telephone jack and ample storage for both 5.