mate

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MATE. The second officer on board of a merchant ship or vessel.
     2. He has the right to sue in the admiralty as a common mariner for wages. 1. Pet. Adm. Dee. 246.
     3. When, on the death of the master, the mate assumes the command, he succeeds to the rights and duties of the principal officer. 1 Sumn. 157; 3 Mason, 161; 4 Mason, 196; See 7 Conn. 239; 4 Mason, 641 4 Wash. C. C. 838.

References in classic literature ?
That's so," confirmed the second mate, suddenly, in his slightly hoarse voice.
What could the mate hope to accomplish by taking Jane Clayton from a camp upon a small island from which there was no escape from the vengeance of Tarzan?
Her mate had slowly relaxed from his crouch and was watching her.
They went through these movements at intervals every day and the robin was never able to explain to his mate what they were doing or tying to do.
And here, sure enough, is my mate Bill, with a spy-glass under his arm, bless his old 'art, to be sure.
Mate and I agreed to go armed henceforth and wait for any sign of cause.
The point is that there are ships where things DO go wrong; but whatever the ship - good or bad, lucky or unlucky - it is in the forepart of her that her chief mate feels most at home.
The effect of this was to turn the lidi toward the right, and the longer I watched the procedure the more convinced I became that Raja and his mate were work-ing together with some end in view, for the she-dog merely galloped steadily at the lidi's right about op-posite his rump.
That was the name he had heard the mate repeatedly call Captain Van Horn.
The noise of our fighting told the mate what was happening, and he put food and water and a sail in the small dingy, which was so small that it was no more than twelve feet long.
And farmed it he had, for twenty years, shrewd, cool-headed, sober, industrious, and thrifty, rising from ship's boy and forecastle hand to mate and master of sailing-ships and thence into steam, second officer, first, and master, from small command to larger, and at last to the bridge of the old Tryapsic--old, to be sure, but worth her fifty thousand pounds and still able to bear up in all seas, and weather her nine thousand tons of freight.
he exclaimed, contemplating the melancholy result, "had I but chosen a mate for myself with half the care that I did for my Dog I should now be a proud and happy father.