understanding

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Understanding

A general term referring to an agreement, either express or implied, written or oral.

The term understanding is an ambiguous one; in order to determine whether a particular understanding would constitute a contract that is legally binding on the parties involved, the circumstances must be examined to discover whether a meeting of the minds and an intent to be bound occurred.

Cross-references

Meeting of Minds.

understanding

(Agreement), noun accord, alliance, arrangement, common view, compact, compliance, concord, concordance, congruence, contract, cooperation, covenant, harmony, meeting of minds, mutual pledge, pact, rapport, unanimity
Associated concepts: express understanding, understanding of the parties
Foreign phrases: Conventio facit legem.An agreement creetes the law, i.e. the parties to a binding contract will be held to their promises.

understanding

(Comprehension), noun apprehension, assimilation, awareness, conception, discernment, grasp, ingenium, insight, intelligence, mens, mental ability, perception, power to underrtand, prehension, realization, reason, recognition, sense, wisdom
Associated concepts: intent, want of understanding
Foreign phrases: Sermones semper accipiendi sunt seeundum subjectam materiam, et conditionem personnrum.Language is always to be understood according to its subject matter and the condition of the person. Probationes debent esse evidentes, id est, perspicuae et faciles intelligi. Proofs ought to be evident, that is, clear and easily understood. Quod tacite intelligitur deesse non videtur. What is tacitly understood does not appear to be wanting.

understanding

(Tolerance), noun acceptance, benevolence, charitableness, compassion, consideration, empathy, good will, humanity, kindliness, lack of prejudice, mercy, patience, sensitivity, sufferance, sympathy, toleration
See also: accord, accordance, adjustment, agreement, apprehension, attornment, bargain, belief, benevolence, benevolent, caliber, charitable, cognition, cognizant, common sense, compact, comprehension, concept, conciliation, concordance, conscious, consideration, consortium, construction, contract, conviction, covenant, deal, discerning, discernment, discrimination, estimate, experience, feeling, humanity, idea, inference, information, insight, intellect, intelligence, judgment, juridical, knowing, knowledge, league, lenience, lenient, longanimity, notion, omniscient, option, pact, patient, perception, perceptive, perspicacious, persuasion, placable, policy, promise, protocol, provision, quid pro quo, rapport, rapprochement, rational, realization, reason, receptive, reconciliation, sagacity, sane, sanity, scienter, sense, sensible, sensitive, settlement, specialty, stipulation, term, tolerance, treaty, vicarious
References in periodicals archive ?
In such an informal assessment, counselors may examine the ways a client constructs his or her narrative in the counseling process, and the counselor may relate this client content to a particular meaning-making stage.
Also, in spite of the teacher's rendition of the word basket and her mispronunciation of "saize" for "says" she was still able to make sense of the story by using good meaning-making strategies.
The panelists will discuss the research supporting these techniques, as well as how to use them with clients; they will also discuss the sometimes neglected role of the funeral as a therapeutic ritual in the meaning-making process.
Second, the objective self, that is, the part of the self that is reflected by more stable personal dispositions, characteristics, and special capacities (Dawis, 1996; Holland, 1997; Mitchell & Krumboltz, 1996), may be considered as relevant content in the meaning-making process.
An international group of contributors who work in psychology, social work, trauma outreach, counseling, and other fields focus on the use of cultural practices, religious and spiritual rituals, and indigenous practices in coping, resilience, and meaning-making after earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis, and floods in countries such as Armenia, the US, Japan, Pakistan, Haiti, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Canada, and South Africa.
of Helsinki, Finland), explore the understanding of meaning-making with a focus on the ideational metafunction, although interactions of the ideational with the two other modes of meaning making, the interpersonal and textual metafunctions, are also featured.
of Venice) responds to the urgent need he sees for a materialist ecosocial semiotics that is able to reconnect body-brain processes and interactions both to the social and cultural practices that directly act upon human bodies, and to the ways in which body and brain processes directly participate in and are a constitutively inseparable part of people's meaning-making activity.