means


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Related to means: means test, Means to an End
References in classic literature ?
Do you mean you are glad I was disgraced before the whole school?
We got a billiard-table over from Stockton," half bashfully interrupted Dick Mattingly, struggling from his end of the trunk to recover his composure, "and it had to be brought over in sections on the back of a mule, so I don't see why--" He stopped short again in confusion, at a sign from his brother, and then added, "I mean, of course, that a piano is a heap more delicate, and valuable, and all that sort of thing, but it's worth trying for.
Now there is that troublesome word VERMA"HLT: to me it has so close a resemblance--either real or fancied--to three or four other words, that I never know whether it means despised, painted, suspected, or married; until I look in the dictionary, and then I find it means the latter.
What women mean by "trusting" might afford a subject for an interesting disquisition.
Communism deprives no man of the power to appropriate the products of society; all that it does is to deprive him of the power to subjugate the labour of others by means of such appropriation.
I apologized; but he continued scornfully, "Since you are impervious to argument, you shall hear with your ears how by means of my two voices I reveal my shape to my Wives, who are at this moment six thousand miles seventy yards two feet eight inches away, the one to the North, the other to the South.
There are, again, some arts which employ all the means above mentioned, namely, rhythm, tune, and metre.
The two notaries were holding a consultation as to the best means of proceeding with the affair.
What do I mean, angel of 'humid light,'" answered Tom, aloud; "I mean all I say, and lots of feeling besides.
I conceived of its effect then, but I conceived of it as a misfortune, a fatality; now I am by no means sure that it was so; hereafter the creation of beauty, as we call it, for beauty's sake, may be considered something monstrous.
To most of us breakfast means, as well as things to eat, mother pouring out the tea and father reading the newspaper.
This means chiefly (1) tracing in a general way, from period to period, the social life of the nation, and (2) getting some acquaintance with the lives of the more important authors.