References in classic literature ?
Well, well, I forgive thee, provided thou dost mend and not show thyself in future so fond of thine own interest, but try to be of good cheer and take heart, and encourage thyself to look forward to the fulfillment of my promises, which, by being delayed, does not become impossible.
I am always ready to mend my manners to my betters," said he, "but I am afraid you cannot teach me any better than you can dust my jacket.
On returning, he began to mend his pen as though he had not even noticed that I was there.
Thee'dst like to ha' a wife to mend thy clothes an' get thy victual, better nor thy old mother.
Now, however, we begin to mend, our party is enlarged by Mrs.
The tinsmiths looked the Woodman over carefully and then answered that they thought they could mend him so he would be as good as ever.
See, here, Matt, I've got some stuff to mend the dish with
It is not a very big plank,' said the Miller, looking at it, 'and I am afraid that after I have mended my barn-roof there won't be any left for you to mend the wheelbarrow with; but, of course, that is not my fault.
Give him the needle and thread and let him mend his ways.
They were two months later than the Major's; and the ship's surgeon congratulated himself upon the treatment adopted by him towards his new patient, who had been consigned to shipboard by the Madras practitioner with very small hopes indeed; for, from that day, the very day that he changed the draught, Major Dobbin began to mend.
But the kindness of the ladies of the town did not end here, for when they came to understand that I was no more maintained by the public allowance as before, they gave me money oftener than formerly; and as I grew up they brought me work to do for them, such as linen to make, and laces to mend, and heads to dress up, and not only paid me for doing them, but even taught me how to do them; so that now I was a gentlewoman indeed, as I understood that word, I not only found myself clothes and paid my nurse for my keeping, but got money in my pocket too beforehand.
For otherwise, whatsoever is new is unlooked for; and ever it mends some, and pairs others; and he that is holpen, takes it for a fortune, and thanks the time; and he that is hurt, for a wrong, and imputeth it to the author.