meritorious

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meritorious

adjective above par, acceptable, approvable, approved, august, benevolent, better, charitable, chivalric, chivalrous, choice, commendable, commendatory, conscientious, credit-worthy, creditable, dazzling, decent, deserving, deserving of commendation, deserving of compliment, deserving of praise, deserving of reward, desirable, dignified, distinctive, distinguished, dutiful, edifying, elevated, eminent, entitled, estimable, ethical, excellent, exemplary, extraordinary, fine, first-rate, generous, glorious, good, good-quality, great, greathearted, guiltless, heroic, high-minded, high-principled, honest, honorable, idealistic, impeccable, incorrupt, incorruptible, irreproachable, just, laudatory, laude dignus, lofty, magnanimous, marvelous, moral, noble, perfect, philanthropic, possessing merit, praiseworthy, preeminent, prime, princely, principled, proper, quality, rare, refined, reliable, reputable, right-minded, righteous, select, solid, sound, splendid, stainless, sterling, sublime, substantial, superior, superlative, supreme, terrifc, tested, unimpeachable, unselfish, upright, valuable, virtuous, well-done, well-intentioned, wonderful, worth imitating, worthwhile, worthy, worthy of fame, worthy of praise
Associated concepts: meritorious cause, meritorious cause of action, meritorious claim, meritorious defense, meritorious grounds
See also: cogent, conscientious, exemplary, high-minded, incorruptible, justifiable, laudable, major, moral, reputable, sterling, unimpeachable
References in periodicals archive ?
12) Again Chopin seems to anticipate Veblen, who points out that "Abstention from labour is the conventional evidence of wealth and is therefore the conventional mark of social standing; and this insistence on the meritoriousness of wealth leads to a more strenuous insistence on leisure" (p.
95, at 83-99 (describing state laws on the right of non-capitally sentenced inmates to habeas representation, and finding that most states provide no right to the appointment of counsel to help an inmate investigate claims and draft a petition, but rather make the right to a lawyer contingent on an inmate's previously filed claims satisfying a certain standard of meritoriousness, or requiring a hearing).
But it also conflicts with the essentialism of most of the family romances in Austen's century according to which the very role of sister carries an a priori meritoriousness.