merriment


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There was color, light, and life in the boy's face now, vivacity in his manner, and genuine merriment in his laugh.
she said, seconding her exhortations by a slap, which resounded very formidably, but which seemed only to knock out so much more laugh from the young ones, as they tumbled precipitately over each other out of doors, where they fairly screamed with merriment.
The room and the house were silent: only now and then the merriment of the billiard-players was heard from above.
Heathcliff followed, his accidental merriment expiring quickly in his habitual moroseness.
The noise and merriment were at their height when the servant came in, and struck the whole party dumb by the announcement of visitors in the drawing-room.
But being thoroughly good-natured, and not much caring what they laughed at, so that they laughed at any rate, he encouraged them in their merriment, and passed the bottle joyously.
I was very merry, I know; but it was hollow merriment.
Of course Shelley's mind was full of the sanctity of the moment, and indignant that "the hour for which the years did sigh" should thus be broken in upon by vulgar revelry; but while we may sympathise with his view, and admit to the full the sacredness, not to say the solemnity, of the marriage ceremony, yet it is to be hoped that it still retains a naturally mirthful side, of which such public merriment is but the crude expression.
I give you plain warning,'' he said, ``fair sirs, that you had better consult how to bear yourselves under these circumstances, than give way to such misplaced merriment.
Debienne and Poligny, who, seeing us pass straight from the gloomiest state of mind to one of the most insolent merriment, acted as though they thought that we had gone mad.
But my belief is that all the senor bachelor's pains will be of no avail to bring a man so hopelessly cracked to his senses again; and if it were not uncharitable, I would say may Don Quixote never be cured, for by his recovery we lose not only his own drolleries, but his squire Sancho Panza's too, any one of which is enough to turn melancholy itself into merriment.
But now he spoke of it lightly, and laughed it off, and made himself so friendly that Friar Tuck was like to choke with merriment.

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