messenger

(redirected from messengers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to messengers: Instant Messengers
See: forerunner, harbinger, informer, liaison, plenipotentiary, proxy, representative, spokesman

MESSENGER. A person appointed to perform certain duties, generally of a ministerial character.
     2. In England, a messenger appointed under the bankrupt laws, is an officer who is authorized to execute the lawful commands of commissioners of bankrupts.

References in classic literature ?
Then Meav's sorrow was bitter, and calling a messenger, she asked if he knew where might be found a young bull to match with White- horned.
The messenger replied that he knew of a much finer bull called Donn Chuailgne, or Brown Bull of Cooley, which belonged to Dawra, the chief of Ulster.
In the midst of this repast, however, the doorbell was heard--young Moss of the ruddy hair rose up with the keys and answered the summons, and coming back, told the Colonel that the messenger had returned with a bag, a desk and a letter, which he gave him.
So that my poor old man's messenger, who had bien mauvaise mine Finette says, and sentoit le Genievre, remained in the hall for some hours waiting my bell.
le Prince the commission with which I would charge you, and that is, that his messenger has been very agreeable to me; but I will tell him so myself.
The messenger was glad enough to sit down along with the others who were there, for his limbs were weary and the ale was good.
The messenger was a chatty soul and loved a bit of gossip dearly; besides, the pot of ale warmed his heart; so that, settling himself in an easy corner of the inn bench, while the host leaned upon the doorway and the hostess stood with her hands beneath her apron, he unfolded his budget of news with great comfort.
Prince Andrew felt that either the actions of Kutuzov's army interested the Minister of War less than any of the other matters he was concerned with, or he wanted to give the Russian special messenger that impression.
Taking the parchment from the messenger, Norman of Torn read:
The closing paragraph be unfortunately worded," said Norman of Torn, "for because of it shall the King's messenger eat the King's message; and thus take back in his belly the answer of Norman of Torn.
If it is no more than that, I have a messenger quite ready.
At this moment the Messenger arrived: he was far too much out of breath to say a word, and could only wave his hands about, and make the most fearful faces at the poor King.