Midwife

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MIDWIFE, med. jur. A woman who practices midwifery; a woman who pursues the business of an account.
     2. A midwife is required to perform the business she undertakes with proper skill, and if she be guilty of any mala praxis, (q.v.) she is liable to an action or an indictment for the misdemeanor. Vide Vin. Ab. Physician; Com. Dig. Physician; 8 East, R. 348; 2 Wils. R. 359; 4 C. & P. 398; S. C. 19 E. C. L. R. 440; 4 C. & P. 407, n. a; 1 Chit. Pr. 43; 2 Russ. Cr. 288.

References in periodicals archive ?
UNFPA supports midwifery in more than 70 countries worldwide, and in 2014 helped launch Bachelor's degree programmes in midwifery in Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Somalia and Zambia.
The Department of Health will also establish a Nursing and Midwifery Policy Unit to make sure clear strategic messages are being delivered.
This aspect grew out of realization that community midwifery (in southern Canada) largely served a fairly homogenous group of women who became involved in midwifery primarily through word-of-mouth, and were enabled, partly through their privilege as white, older, middle-class, educated, and family-centred women, to choose to give birth outside of mainstream sociomedical norms (Biggs 2004; Bourgeault 2000).
8220;The growth in the field of midwifery is due, in great part, to the culture of collaboration nurse-midwives have with physicians, nurse practitioners and other healthcare providers to provide safe options for women,” says Frontier Nursing's President Dr.
The relationship between midwifery and its sister profession, nursing, has not been as intense or as public.
In Britain, midwifery legislation was implemented in England and Wales in 1902, Scotland in 1916 and Northern Ireland in 1918.
During this time students are immersed in the social, practical and ethical context of practice and this influences their understanding of the culture of midwifery and their place in it.
Unfortunately these programmes are carefully edited and often give a skewed impression of what Midwifery is about so we would discourage reference to them within personal statements.
Jim Brown, from Skills4Nurses, said: "There are so few jobs in nursing and midwifery in Scotland.
The women completed an 18-month Bachelor's programme offered by the hospital in the Applied Science of Midwifery.
This was not the only report concerning community practitioners at the time; others included the 1999 Department of Health report Making a Difference: Strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and health care and the Chief Nursing Officer's Review of the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Vulnerable Children and Young People, which appeared in 2004.