depression

(redirected from minor depression)
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Related to minor depression: dysthymia, Major depression

depression

noun debasement, decline, deflation, depreciation, despondence, despondency, dispiritedness, dolefulness, economic decline, gloom, lowering, lowness, maeror, sinking, slump
Associated concepts: economic depression
See also: anguish, curtailment, decrease, distress, pessimism, prostration
References in periodicals archive ?
Double-blind comparison of sertraline and placebo in stroke patients with minor depression and less severe major depression.
This paper provides a reply to the Wong (AJHM 24:3;97-9) critique of the Rapaport et al (2011) study which found no significant difference between St John's wort, citalopram and placebo in treating minor depression.
Some have reported that African Americans are less likely to suffer from major depression than other ethnic groups, but more likely to suffer from dysthymia and minor depression (Jonas et al.
In a rare admission from the generally conservative National Institute of Mental Health, their conclusion was, "We find DHEA to be an effective treatment for midlife-onset major and minor depression.
This found that those with major or minor depression had an increased risk of mortality, compared to those with only diabetes; the former group having a death rate of 13.
The findings of the analysis revealed that death rates were up to 25 per cent higher for patients who experienced depressive symptoms, and up to 39 per cent higher among patients diagnosed with major or minor depression.
TEENAGERS who experience minor depression are at greater risk of serious depression, anxiety and eating disorders as adults, according to new research.
Police said she was suffering from minor depression for which she was taking medication.
27) This percentage of minor depression is slightly higher than those reported in some studies mentioned above, but is significantly lower than those presented by Paivarinta et al (45), Buys et al (44) and Jeste et al (49), who pointed out that between 15 and 25% of adults aged 65 and older are affected by clinically relevant depression.
The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders identified 24 of these women, who completed a questionnaire about their preferences for receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy, with major depressive disorder or minor depression.
In another study, of a total 473 depressed patients, 404 (247 with minor depression and 157 with major depression) were identified and followed up.
Results: Researchers found that levels of 25(OH)D were 14% lower in 169 persons with minor depression and 14% lower in 26 persons with major depressive disorder compared with levels in 1087 control individuals.