mirror

(redirected from mirrors)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
References in classic literature ?
None of the men's faces were mirrors of large thoughts.
Oh, my lord," said D'Artagnan, quietly shutting the window, "it is not worth while weeping yet, for probably an hour hence there will not be one of your mirrors remaining in the Palais Royal, whether they be Venetian or Parisian.
Here were two bright and beautiful little lakes, set like mirrors in the midst of stern and rocky heights, and surrounded by grassy meadows, inexpressibly refreshing to the eye.
THAT same Thursday morning, as Arthur Donnithorne was moving about in his dressing-room seeing his well-looking British person reflected in the old-fashioned mirrors, and stared at, from a dingy olive-green piece of tapestry, by Pharaoh's daughter and her maidens, who ought to have been minding the infant Moses, he was holding a discussion with himself, which, by the time his valet was tying the black silk sling over his shoulder, had issued in a distinct practical resolution.
I found myself in a salon with a very well-painted, highly varnished floor; chairs and sofas covered with white draperies, a green porcelain stove, walls hung with pictures in gilt frames, a gilt pendule and other ornaments on the mantelpiece, a large lustre pendent from the centre of the ceiling, mirrors, consoles, muslin curtains, and a handsome centre table completed the inventory of furniture.
Little as I understood of the language, yet from his animated gestures and the varying expression of his features--reflected as from so many mirrors in the countenances around him, I could easily discover the nature of those passions which he sought to arouse.
loose the falling midnight of your hair, And in those stars, your eyes, let me behold Mine image, as in mirrors.
The richest hangings and the thickest carpets, glistening flagstones and pictures, with their richly gilded frames; in every direction could be seen candelabra, mirrors, and furniture and fittings of the most sumptuous character; in every direction, also, were guards of the proudest military bearing, with floating plumes, crowds of attendants and courtiers in the ante-chambers and upon the staircases.
It was situated on the Boulevard Haussmann, on the first floor, and consisted of a series of rooms, gilded from floor to ceiling a foot thick, draped in various light shades of satin, and chiefly furnished with mirrors and clocks.
In fact, a room with four or five mirrors arranged at random, is, for all purposes of artistic show, a room of no shape at all.
Pierre well remembered this small circular drawing room with its mirrors and little tables.
She is a very vain creature, and lives mostly in a room surrounded by mirrors, so that she can admire herself whichever way she looks.