misalliance


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And given the stated meaning of the play, in terms of houses and destruction, misalliance and eugenics, what we find is a monstrous predestinarian politics.
His dismissal of this rainbow misalliance of feminists, Marxists, and structuralists, all of them 'neo-obscurantists' (p.
Harry: Thanks, Karen, but I see that the social work profession and social work education over these past 50 years has become increasingly engaged in a triple misalliance, the elements of which are science and empiricism in professional education, psychotherapy, and private practice.
While Posan Singh's first wife pines away in sorrow and shame over her husbands misalliance, the union of Hirni, Birni, and Posan Singh bears children.
In this misalliance, Cunningham emerged as a curiously chaste bride-groom.
While Immanuel Breitkopf's improvements in printing music from movable type certainly provided impressive technical and aesthetic solutions, did it in fact prove to be a misalliance of technology and economics?
Watkins (1993) Culture and Economic Approaches to Fertility: Proper Marriage or Misalliance.
In the second half of the novel, Pamela wins over those who had disapproved of the misalliance.
This creative misalliance between the vulgar and the pretentious not only nonplussed the outsider but aided the counterattack of those singers who protested against the slurs on their profession.
While these late eighteenth century women both anticipate and confirm Frederick Douglass's claim, in mid nineteenth-century America, that "the cause of the slave has been peculiarly woman's cause," their writings also reveal clearly why any political link between white women and black people was doomed to be a bitter misalliance.
George Bernard Shaw had it in Misalliance (1910) that "there's a wall ten feet thick and ten miles high between parent and child,"(15) and prescriptively: "No man should know his own child.