misanthropic

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Related to misanthropy: misanthrope
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The treatment of mental illness in the film was respectful though somewhat silly; rife with wincing, finger-to-the-temple revelations and stereotypical misanthropy.
Apart from the factors Selfishness and Misanthropy, the rest of the factors are present in the sample.
Doused in blood and gushing with ethical conundrums, A Yi's A Perfect Crime is a disconcerting medley of misanthropy, escapism, and media monstrosities.
The change of generosity to misanthropy in nature is portrayed as an allegory other than a result of inner conflicts.
Mystery, misanthropy, and mischief combine in this delightfully dark cautionary tale, written in an absorbing limerick style.
It's not just the mordant misanthropy, the way he insults a nurse or tells an annoying bank clerk she's "just a spoke on a wheel".
Vi is just plain vicious; she's provocative, she enjoys making condescending and hurtful remarks about everyone, and basically she's the epitome of misanthropy.
The topics include the century of science and the culture of pessimism, the paternalism of the precautionary coalition, anti-vivisection and the culture of misanthropy, genetically modified crops and the perils of rejecting innovation, and skepticism and science as drivers of progress regarding climate change.
The young all naturally think of Evelyn Waugh as a figure of the older generation, crusty, gnarled, obstinate in his misanthropy and his hostility to all progress.
In addition, they had lower rank in hysteric, misanthropy, mania, social introspection rather than normal and this is significant.
Denise Mina Author of Gods and Beasts "McIlvanney was the first to recognise the fit between American noir crime fiction and Scottish misanthropy.
It becomes quickly apparent that Timon is also a play that is steeped in many forms of excess and this article is interested in the verbal excesses that both plays exhibit, typically to denote feelings of anger and misanthropy.