momentousness


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21) To begin with, conjuring the momentousness of the ceremony, the egwugwu are deemed "the most powerful and the most secret cult in the clan" (Achebe 1996, 63); their voices are represented as "guttural and awesome" (62).
The momentousness of that change is tempered by the fact that the paper had a daily circulation of around 1,000 and mainly publishes legal announcements.
Collins's choice of the seduction plot framework for her novel, as well as its romantically aristocratic Old South setting, may seem jarringly out of touch with the epoch during which she wrote it, oblivious to the momentousness of the year 1865 in the history of African America.
It's all fascinating stuff, dripping with the momentousness of jazz history revisited, when the real giants of the music still roamed, if not the earth, then the jazz clubs of Manhattan.
With these words, Clifton bends us into the fear of death, the longing of survival and the momentousness of the past.
The spoiled, self-centered-sounding parents interviewed at Kenter Canyon Elementary missed a wonderful opportunity to show their children the momentousness of the president of the United States' motorcade.
In my defence, my irrational state of over-excitement had been caused by the momentousness of the occasion - my first-born's tour of the primary school that he'll start going to in August.
But sitting in the Al Hirschfeld Theatre ten days before the opening and three days after a querulous article in The New York Times about the show's skimpy advance, the newly minted director-choreographer appeared utterly unfazed by the momentousness of it all.
The mundane and comical always undercut the momentousness of the historical.