mouth


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Related to mouth: Salivary glands, Mouth ulcer
References in classic literature ?
They can turn in the water like a flash, wherefore it is not wise to pat one on the tail lest it present its mouth instead.
I had of course long been used to a halter and a headstall, and to be led about in the fields and lanes quietly, but now I was to have a bit and bridle; my master gave me some oats as usual, and after a good deal of coaxing he got the bit into my mouth, and the bridle fixed, but it was a nasty thing
I opened my mouth to begin; but she grabbed me and hustled me in behind the bed, and says:
Joe sat with her head bending over her needlework, I put my mouth into the forms of saying to Joe, "What's a convict?
The lion ran first, and as he came he roared; then followed the lioness, but she did not roar, for in her mouth was the cub that Umslopogaas had assegaied in the cave.
So much to give the reader some idea of the secret watering-place of Yellowsands, situated at the mouth of that romantic little torrent, the river Sly.
The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.
Feeling himself so smitten, he imagined himself slain or badly wounded for certain, and recollecting his liquor he drew out his flask, and putting it to his mouth began to pour the contents into his stomach; but ere he had succeeded in swallowing what seemed to him enough, there came another almond which struck him on the hand and on the flask so fairly that it smashed it to pieces, knocking three or four teeth and grinders out of his mouth in its course, and sorely crushing two fingers of his hand.
When her side is turned towards us, we see her as a straight line; when the end containing her eye or mouth -- for with us these two organs are identical -- is the part that meets our eye, then we see nothing but a highly lustrous point; but when the back is presented to our view, then -- being only sub-lustrous, and, indeed, almost as dim as an inanimate object -- her hinder extremity serves her as a kind of Invisible Cap.
In the course of her voyage she discovered the mouth of a large river in lat.
The pipe was in the old dame's mouth when she said these words.
Its head and mouth are similar in appearance to those of a hippopotamus, except that from the sides of the lower jawbone two mighty horns curve slightly downward toward the front.