cell

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cell

(Enemy combatants), noun enemy group, exxremist group, rebel organization, saboteurs, subversives, unnerground extremists
Associated concepts: enemy combatants, justice courts, miliiary tribunals, Patriotic Act, prison cells, sleeper cell, terrorist cell

cell

(jail), noun cage, cella, chamber, compartment, confined room, confinement, cubicle, cubiculum, enclosed cage, incarceration, jailhouse, penitentiary, pound, prison, prison house, small cavity, small room, solitary abode
See also: chamber, jail, penitentiary, prison

CELL. A small room in a prison. See Dungeon.

References in periodicals archive ?
Once they were able to isolate skeletal muscle cells using the newly identified surface markers, the research team matured those cells in the lab to create dystrophin-producing muscle fibers.
The development of atherosclerotic plaques is a slow and gradual process, pathologically characterized by the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells [1-10].
The cytoskeleton of the vertebrate smooth muscle cell.
In vitro, infected arterial smooth muscle cells accumulated cholesterol.
However, interrupting the Wnt signal caused myoblasts already on their way to becoming muscle cells to switch gear and develop into fat.
The symptoms associated with LAM are caused by the excessive growth of the muscle cells around the airways, and blood and lymph vessels.
Beating heart muscle cells were formed within 12 days.
The finding, appearing in the April 3 Science, contradicts the belief of many scientists that heart muscle cells present at death have been around since birth.
Bone marrow not only can differentiate into heart cells but also smooth muscle cells, connective tissue cells, and other types of cells to reconstitute the entire structure of a tissue," he said.
Previous work in direct reprogramming, jumping straight from a cell type involved in scarring to heart muscle cells, has a low success rate.
Cao and her colleagues have taken a big step in that direction, showing that a toxic protein destroys muscle cells inside the patients' arteries.
Unlike other cell types, such as heart cells, neurons and cells found in the gut, previous attempts to efficiently and accurately derive muscle cells from pre-cursor cells or culture have not been fruitful.