length

(redirected from muscle length)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

length

noun breadth, continuance, dimension, distance lengthwise, elongation, expanse, expansion, extensiveness, extent, lengthiness, limit, long-windedness, magnitude, measure, measurement, proportion, range, reach, size, span, stretch
Associated concepts: length of memoranda of law, term limit
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of prosthesis design on muscle length and moment arms in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.
Joint stiffness on one side of the body, scar tissue that restricts muscle length, or a discrepancy in major muscle strength all throw the body out of alignment.
1995) The effects of therapeutic application of heat or cold followed by static stretch on hamstring muscle length.
We have already reviewed the evidence that stretching of modest duration only temporarily increases muscle length, but what is the subsequent effect on performance?
There is no change in muscle length, no change in relationship between the bones the muscle attaches to, no joint motion, no movement.
13] Muscle performance is optimal when contraction comes from the normal resting muscle length.
This difference is consistent with estimates of muscle stretch, where the overall muscle length change was smaller for phase 0 and larger for phases 0.
Joint range of motion and muscle length testing, 2d ed.
In contrast, during in vivo valve adductions, muscle length decreases, suggesting that force production in vivo (at the level of the adductor muscle) should be lower than force production during isometric contractions in vitro.
Physical risk factors for low back pain consisted of insufficient lumbar stability, decreased neural mobility, decreased muscle length and impaired lumbosacral proprioception (Burton et al 2004).
the acting of gripping devices for rigid bodies for which the variation of muscle length is very small, and the force is determined, linear, depending on the pressure;
Gradual stimulation of the musculature with progressively more difficult workloads reduces the inhibitory impulses picked-up by the sensory receptors that monitor changes in muscle length.