mute

(redirected from muteness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to muteness: Apraxia of Speech

mute

adjective close-lipped, closemouthed, dumb, hushed, inarticulate, incapable of speech, incommunicative, indisposed to talk, noiseless, pauciloquent, quiet, refraining from utterance, reserved, reticent, silent, soundless, speechless, still, taciturn, tight-lipped, tongue-tied, unable to speak, unable to utter articulate sound, uncommunicative, unexpressive, unloquacious, untalkative, unvocal, unvocalizing, voiceless, wordless
See also: inarticulate, moderate, repress, speechless, stifle, subdue, taciturn, unresponsive

mute

a person arraigned on indictment who refuses to answer a charge.

MUTE, persons. One who is dumb. Vide Deaf and Dumb.

MUTE, STANDING MUTE, practice, crim. law. When a prisoner upon his arraignment totally refuses to answer, insists upon mere frivolous pretences, or refuses to put himself upon the country, after pleading not guilty, he is said to stand mute.
     2. In the case of the United States v. Hare, et al., Circuit Court, Maryland Dist. May sess. 1818, the prisoner standing mute was considered as if he had pleaded not guilty.
     3. The act of congress of March 3, 1825, 3 Story's L. U. S. 2002, has since provided as follows; Sec. 14, That if any person, upon his or her arraignment upon any indictment before any court of the United States for any offence, not capital, shall stand mute, or will not answer or plead to such indictment, the court shall, notwithstanding, proceed to the trial of the person, so standing mute, or refusing to answer or pleas, as if he or she had pleaded not guilty; and upon a verdict being returned by the jury, may proceed to render judgment accordingly. A similar provision is to be found in the laws of Pennsylvania.
     4. The barbarous punishment of peine forte et dure which till lately disgraced the criminal code of England, was never known in the United States. Vide Dumb; 15 Vin. Ab. 527.
     5. When a prisoner stands mute, the laws of England arrive at the forced conclusion that he is guilty, and punish him accordingly. 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 428.
     6. By the old French law, when a person accused was mute, or stood mute, it was the duty of the judge to appoint him a curator, whose duty it was to defend him, in the best manner he could; and for this purpose, he was allowed to communicate with him privately. Poth. Proced. Crim. s. 4, art. 2, Sec. 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
Your implication is that the muteness of the archaeological object mimics or echoes the remoteness of an earlier attachment experience; one might hope that it would be possible to 'persuade' the object to speak, to respond and offer up its secrets while re-experiencing in a more controlled way the original trauma of its remoteness and inaccessibility.
Most importantly is the muteness of the first few minutes.
It is an idea that has been provocatively raised by Barbara Johnson, who in her reading of Jane Campion's The Piano (1993) argues that muteness can represent "a form of resistance and subject-hood" (1998, 143).
Here, the elements of a political discourse (morality, community, approval (law), and competence) are examined simultaneously in order to show how the discourse elements in narratives on revolution are configured, and how certain elements express saliency and muteness.
His muteness is Buddhist, but has much to teach us.
From the above verse in Proverbs, which considers God's counsel one of many considerations that rattle around in our consciousness, to the rabbinic laments about God's muteness or even absence, our tradition is riddled with a kind of theological pluralism that is hard to find in modern life.
To summarize the symbolic actions in chapters 3-4: In 3:24-27, Ezekiel's role as a prophet of rebuke is transformed into a mission of muteness and passivity; he also symbolizes Israel's paralysis during the upcoming siege.
Reporting on Serbian imperialism in Kosovo in 1999, reporter Deborah Amos observed extensive paralysis and muteness in response to the trauma and violence, phenomena commonly attested in research on trauma effects.
Hearing that provides sounds of immense satisfaction, Gives way to muteness of sizeable dissatisfaction.
Peretz, Polish Yiddish short-story writer, poet, dramatist, and essayist who dominated Jewish letters and thought at the turn of the twentieth century, uses muteness in "Bontzye Schveig" ("Bontshe the Silent") to pose thought provoking questions designed to challenge Diaspora Jews to re-examine their place in the modern world.
In his work there are the silences; a muteness pointing to an allusion to that which is not disempowered but hidden.