narrate

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From a state of quiescence or stasis that we infer was there before the beginning of the narrative, a crisis occurs, a desire is born, something narratable happens.
already comes to us perceptibly as a narratable self with a unique story [storia]" (Cavarero, Relating Narratives 34; emphasis in the original).
In Haley's version, Malcolm X-now, as narrator, makes the very story of American racism narratable because he saves readers from being lost hopelessly and forever in the opening nightmare from which we wish to escape totally.
17) More often than not, the places, events, and characters James encounters on his travels are significant for him precisely because he can exploit them for associations and, further, because they are often silent, incommunicable, neither yielding narrative nor being narratable.
as narratable as were [Jamie's older brother] Nick's.
in the acceptance of a concept of a love that is starkly inimical to the continuity of the social order and to the institutions of continuity and narration (marriage, the Church, and so forth)," a concept he contrasted with "the texts and the traditions that have privileged those continuums, those unities: love that is agape (and not eros), orthodox (and not mystical), narratable (and not lyric)" (p.
Miller argues that the "narrative theory proposed by Crabbe" is one in which there is a "double claim: the claim that any human life, however strange, hangs together, and the claim that any human life is therefore narratable.
In short, the story is narratable (keenly interesting, because Gilgamesh is so mighty) but not deontological: we never are enjoined to imitate Gilgamesh; we are accepted as mere listeners.
is seasoned by a commentary bespeaking wider, narratable experience.
Bone uses Lewis Simpson's term "postsouthern," which, despite Bone's stated intention to reinvent the term in keeping with a "historical-geographical materialism" (46), rather unavoidably entails a kind of decline narrative: once there was a coherent South narratable in traditional (read: agrarian) terms, now there is not (cf.
il labbro, spinge contro il muro alto, nel cerchio breve, scioglie il lamento, il pianto," so Gioachino Martinez, returning to Palermo from Milan, assesses the bankruptcy of narratable historical reality: "Aborriva il romanzo, questo genere scaduto, corrotto, impraticabile.
The final chapter begins with Milton's conception of his life as a narratable "life-work," but soon moves to the story that Milton had his daughters read him books in languages they did not understand.