natural

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Related to natural history: Field Museum of Natural History, Natural history of disease

natural

adjective artless, authentic, characteristic, connate, consistent, crude, free from affectation, genuine, inborn, inbred, indigenous, ingenerate, ingrained, innate, innatus, instinctive, instinctual, lifelike, native, nativus, normal, organic, original, pure, real, regular, true to life, typical, unadulterated, unartificial, uncultivated, unsynthetic, untouched
Associated concepts: natural law
See also: bodily, born, common, conventional, current, customary, familiar, genuine, habitual, informal, ingenuous, inherent, innate, legitimate, naive, native, normal, organic, physical, prevailing, real, realistic, regular, simple, sincere, spontaneous, unaffected, undistorted, unobtrusive, unpretentious, usual, veridical

SERVITUDES, NATURAL, civil law. Those servitudes which arise in consequence of the nature of the soil.
     2. By law the inferior heritages, are submitted in relation to the natural flow of waters, and the like, to the superior. An inferior field is, therefore, subject to the injury or prejudice which the situation of the ground, in its natural state, way cause it.

References in classic literature ?
I shall have the pleasure of acknowledging the great assistance which I have received from several other naturalists, in the course of this and my other works; but I must be here allowed to return my most sincere thanks to the Reverend Professor Henslow, who, when I was an undergraduate at Cambridge, was one chief means of giving me a taste for Natural History, -- who, during my absence, took charge of the collections I sent home, and by his correspondence directed my endeavours, -- and who, since my return, has constantly rendered me every assistance which the kindest friend could offer.
At the instant he fell a remarkable item of natural history leaped to his mind.
piece of natural history, which we give on the authority of the
I declare that this bold metaphor is admirable, and that the natural history of the theatre, on a day of allegory and royal marriage songs, is not in the least startled by a dolphin who is the son of a lion.
On Nicholas stopping to salute them, Mr Lenville laughed a scornful laugh, and made some general remark touching the natural history of puppies.
Godard was devoted more especially to natural history.
Others of Lyly's affectations are rhetorical questions, hosts of allusions to classical history, and literature, and an unfailing succession of similes from all the recondite knowledge that he can command, especially from the fantastic collection of fables which, coming down through the Middle Ages from the Roman writer Pliny, went at that time by the name of natural history and which we have already encountered in the medieval Bestiaries.
Civil and natural history, the history of art and of literature, must be explained from individual history, or must remain words.
On the one hand, he surprised himself by his discoveries in natural history, finding that his piece of garden-ground contained wonderful caterpillars, slugs, and insects, which, so far as he had heard, had never before attracted human observation; and he noticed remarkable coincidences between these zoological phenomena and the great events of that time,--as, for example, that before the burning of York Minster there had been mysterious serpentine marks on the leaves of the rose-trees, together with an unusual prevalence of slugs, which he had been puzzled to know the meaning of, until it flashed upon him with this melancholy conflagration.
Markham, a natural history, with all kinds of birds and beasts in it, and the reading as nice as the pictures
He took the boys to the British Museum and descanted upon the antiquities and the specimens of natural history there, so that audiences would gather round him as he spoke, and all Bloomsbury highly admired him as a prodigiously well-informed man.
Morcerf had expected he should be the guide; on the contrary, it was he who, under the count's guidance, followed a course of archaeology, mineralogy, and natural history.

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