natural impulse

See: conatus
References in classic literature ?
White Fang's natural impulse, when he saw the live food fluttering about him and under his very nose, was to spring upon it.
Now if in this particular science any one would attend to its original seeds, and their first shoot, he would then as in others have the subject perfectly before him; and perceive, in the first place, that it is requisite that those should be joined together whose species cannot exist without each other, as the male and the female, for the business of propagation; and this not through choice, but by that natural impulse which acts both upon plants and animals also, for the purpose of their leaving behind them others like themselves.
It is a natural impulse, in every one, when they hear a tale of distress, to think of something to say by way of consolation.
This longing stirred in the hearts of Rose and Mac, and by a natural impulse both turned to Dr.
But, D'Artagnan, be assured I will not yield to this first and natural impulse.
There was a lurking look of triumph, though very differently expressed, in the faces of his two companions, which made it a natural impulse on Mr Haredale's part not to give way before this leader, but to stand there while he passed.
It would have been easy for him to get out of it; but his natural impulse was for frankness, and he remembered his old resolve to be frank, no matter what happened.
The natural impulse to assist her and to spare her got the better of the judgment, the caution, the worldly tact, which an older, wiser, and colder man might have summoned to help him in this strange emergency.
As the young man looked up and saw the fierce aspect of the group, which was increasing at each instant by the accession of some countenance and figure, apparently more forbidding than any which had preceded it, he drew his rifle, by a very natural impulse, from beneath him, and commenced putting it in a state for service.
He was blessed with a natural impulse to disfigure with a direct, unreasoning blow the comely visage of temptation.
The curtain over the panes being drawn back a little he, by a very natural impulse, looked in, just as he made ready to turn the handle.
Heathcliff arrived underneath just at the critical moment; by a natural impulse he arrested his descent, and setting him on his feet, looked up to discover the author of the accident.