natural meaning

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The country's dairy products, on the other hand, are natural meaning that they are all natural and are made without the use of any growth hormones," he added.
In a statement she said: "Today the High Court found that my tweet constituted a serious libel, both in its natural meaning and as an innuendo.
A Tweet by libelled Lord In a statement, Mrs Bercow said: "Today the High Court found my tweet constituted a serious libel, both in its natural meaning and as an innuendo.
To interpret a contract, the court reads the terms of the contract as a whole, giving the words their ordinary and natural meaning in the context of the agreement, the parties' relationship and all the relevant facts surrounding the transaction, so far as known to the parties.
Generally an employer will be able to rely upon the natural meaning of the words spoken.
Jack Straw's attempt to twist the words out of any natural meaning is a sure sign of a student taught at the Bill Clinton academy of devious politics.
Because marriage already has a natural meaning, in itself it does not point to something eschatological.
It would in any case be entirely ineffective as the parties would still remain governed by the natural meaning of the words in the user clauses contained in their tenancy agreements under Common Law.
The ordinary and natural meaning of the clause, irrespective of what insurers may now seek to argue they meant by it, is any infectious or contagious disease.
Her discussion of the Philosophical Investigations focuses on the famous concept of "language-games," which she interprets as prefiguring "post-structural" rejections of an inherent or natural meaning in language.
Therefore, the act's goals are better served by giving section 10(b) its natural meaning and imposing liability on all whose false assertions are reasonably calculated to influence the investing public.